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Q-SITE
CONFERENCE

A Canadian Student
Quantum Conference

September 29th – October 1st, 2023

Location: University of British Columbia (Vancouver campus)
Room: KAIS 2020/2030

Welcome to Q-SITE, a Canadian Student Conference on Quantum Science, Information, Technology, and Engineering happening this fall on UBC campus. Join us for engaging discussions and workshops on quantum communication and security, quantum algorithms and applications, quantum hardware and more. Secure your spot now for
Q-SITE 2023!

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Canada's First Student-Centric Quantum Conference 

Quantum Information Science and Technology (QIST) is an emerging interdisciplinary field poised to revolutionize various areas such as cryptography, communications, simulation, material discovery, sensing, and computing. This challenges global engineers, physicists, computer scientists, mathematicians, economists, and policymakers to collaborate for breakthroughs. 


Q-SITE engages undergraduate students in QIST by inviting researchers and educators from academia and industry to give talks, panels, and tutorials on cutting edge research topics and industry-leading applications. The Q-SITE program is specifically designed to jump start attendees’ quantum curiosity and careers – from the ground up.

Interested in QIST? You're in the right place. Explore our program for insightful seminars and talks.

DAY 1

Quantum
Communication &
Security

Quantum Networks, Quantum Security, Quantum Internet Devices & more

DAY 3

Quantum Hardware

Hardware Noise, Spin Qubits, Trapped ions & more

DAY 2

 Quantum Algorithms and Applications

Quantum Chemistry, Quantum simulations, QML & more

THE CONFERENCE

3

DAYS

19

TECHNICAL TALKS &

KEYNOTES

4

WORKSHOPS & PANELS

20

GUEST SPEAKERS

1

MINI-HACKATON 

POSTER PRESENTATION SESSION

NETWORKING DINNER

POP-UP EXHIBIT

SPONSORS

Platinum
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Gold
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Bronze
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Thank you for supporting
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IBM Quantum

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MINI CHALLENGES

Come join Q-SITE for its very own mini-hackathon where sponsor companies such as Quantum VillageClassiq, and IBM host coding challenges. You will be able to solve these challenges through Saturday night in teams of 2-4, with top submission teams winning awards!

POSTER SESSION

We are excited to feature a poster session at the conference, showcasing both undergraduate and graduate research. The poster presentation session is scheduled for Saturday, September 30th, from 5:15 pm to 6:15 pm at the Kaiser (ECE) Building on the UBC Vancouver campus.

We aim for this opportunity to not only exercise young quantum talent but also provide a spotlight for student research projects in this emerging field!

Interested? Click on "Call for Student Posters" for more details.


Team

  • Chair: Sherwin Tiu
    Affiliation: The University of British Columbia (UBC) I am a third year Electrical Engineering student interested in technologies that could make a better world. I also work with the UBC Quantum Club to promote quantum computing to further awareness of the technology to undergraduates in Metro Vancouver.
  • Associate: Ehsan Nadeem
    Affiliation: Simon Fraser University (SFU) Chemical Physics Undergraduate at SFU, with an interest in Nuclear Chemistry Research.
  • Director: Lily Watt
    Affiliation: The University of British Columbia (UBC) Hi Q-SITE! I'm Lily, an Engineering Physics student at UBC, and the Q-SITE Logistics director. I am also part of the team at the UBC Quantum Club, making Quantum Computing accessible to undergraduates of all skill levels. Happy to chat at in/lily-watt
  • Associate: Shahzad Shams
    Affiliation: The University of British Columbia (UBC) Second year biomedical engineering at UBC interested in the intersection between quantum computing and biomedical applications.
  • Associate: Omid Bodaghi
    Affiliation: University of Calgary I am a Master's student and work on post-quantum cryptography.
  • Associate: Hrishikesh Patel
    Affiliation: The University of British Columbia (UBC) I am Hrishi and I'm pursuing MSc. Physics @ UBC! My research interests lie on the interface of QI and CMT. Whenever I'm not doing Physics/Math, you can find me running, hiking or reading!
  • Director: Revika Jain
    Affiliation: The University of British Columbia (UBC) Hello, I am a 4th year computer Science student at Simon Fraser University! I Have a keen interest in quantum computing and I have been able to grow my skills during my co-op term at D-wave systems. Looking forward to meeting everyone!
  • Director: Malcolm Pidsosny
    Affiliation: Simon Fraser University (SFU) Hi! My name is Malcolm. I am currently in my last semester of my BSc majoring in Physics at SFU. My research focus is in stellar astrophysics, however I also love quantum mechanics and the concept of connecting relativity and quantum through quantum gravity.
  • Associate: Neil Jadav
    Affiliation: The University of British Columbia (UBC) Neil is a 3rd year student at UBC pursuing an honours in physics and astronomy in the faculty of science, with the hope of pursuing academia and research opportunities.
  • Associate: Jenny Zhu
    Affiliation: The University of British Columbia (UBC)
  • Director: Valentina Mazzotti
    Affiliation: The University of British Columbia (UBC) Valentina is currently in her fourth year of an undergraduate degree in physics and computer science at UBC. Her primary focus is on computational condensed matter physics to guide the discovery and prediction of new material properties.
  • Director: Esther Kim
    Affiliation: The University of British Columbia (UBC) Hey guys, my name is Esther and I am a rising third year at UBC, currently in the combined major of chemistry and biology and researching at UBC under the field of neuroscience. I enjoy going on long walks and listening to R&B.
  • UPDATED | 6:15 - 6:55 PM | Talk by Elizabeth Kleisath
    Title: Sharing your science passion: communicating quantum without hype Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: “Quantum” is frequently used as a buzzword favoured by advertisers and marketers, aimed to appeal to consumers for its science-forward and mysterious allure. Yet, all too often, these “quantum-powered” products have nothing to do with actual quantum science or technology. The broad misrepresentation of quantum in today’s pop culture shouldn’t prevent us from sharing quantum stories and discoveries in ways that are grounded in scientific reality. Clearly communicating quantum research and its real-world impacts is an important skill. It’s key to securing recognition and funding, inspiring new generations of quantum scientists, and engaging and educating the genuinely curious public. This talk will provide you with tools and confidence to share your passion and interest in quantum information science and technology, and find the right communication style for you to meaningfully connect with a variety of audiences. About the speaker: Elizabeth Kleisath is the Communications Officer at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC), a research institute at the University of Waterloo. Elizabeth holds master's degrees in materials chemistry and science communications. She is passionate about sharing her curiosity about the world around us and has a talent for explaining complicated science topics in approachable ways. At IQC, Elizabeth is responsible for sharing quantum stories about the research and breakthroughs happening at the institute.
  • 5:55 - 6.10 PM | Talk by Bahiyyih Peters
    Title: The Quantum BC Community Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: The Quantum BC Community includes students, faculty and industry involved in quantum computing in British Columbia (and beyond). Find out about the many exciting activities and opportunities including seminars, workshops, courses, mentorships, scholarships and more. There will also be a virtual Quantum BC Open House on November 8 with lots of information and a chance to ask questions. Find out more at www.quantum-bc.ca About the speaker: Bahiyyih Peters Bahiyyih Peters is the Program Coordinator of the NSERC CREATE in Quantum Computing Program. With a background in Sociology and Music, Bahiyyih has years of work and volunteer experience organizing events and building community. She is passionate about student engagement and providing opportunities for marginalized groups in STEAM.
  • 2:30 - 3:30 PM | Registration and Snacks
    Location: Kaiser Concourse (KAIS 2020/2030) Fred Kaiser Building 2332 Main Mall Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z4, Canada Get Directions
  • 4.30 - 5.15 PM | Talk by Barry Sanders
    Title: Quantum kittens, cats, combs and compasses: superposing coherent states for sensing, communication, computing and pleasure Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: Superpositions of coherent states, which have minimum uncertainty and follow, at least transiently, classical motion, constitute codes for quantum computing, enhance quantum communication and are advantageous for quantum sensing and metrology. I present a potted history of this field followed by our proposal for making a nuclear cat state reported in arXiv:2304.13813. About the speaker: Barry Sanders is Scientific Director of Calgary’s “Quantum City”, which is within the University of Calgary and tasked with building a strong quantum ecosystem in Alberta. Dr Sanders’s 1988 Doctor of Philosophy and 2018 Doctor of Science are awarded by Imperial College London, and his theoretical research comprises quantum sensing, quantum and quantum-resilient communication, quantum computing and quantum optics. He held numerous distinguished international visiting professorships and affiliations and is a Scientist with the Creative Destruction Lab at the Universities of Toronto and Calgary. Sanders serves as an Expert with the Canadian Council of Academies and on expert panels in Canada, USA and Europe. Dr Sanders is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, of the United Kingdom Institute of Physics, of the American Physical Society, and of Optica, and he received the City of Calgary International Achievement Award in 2022.
  • 7:05 - 7:20 PM | Group Photo
    Time for a Group Photo!
  • 7:20 - 9:20 PM | Dinner & Networking
    Join us for a Dinner & Networking Session! Location: KAIS 2020/2030
  • 5:30 - 5:50 PM | Lightning Talk by Rahul Deshpande
    Title: Introduction to Annealing Quantum Computing Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: Unlike other types of quantum technology, annealing quantum computing is uniquely suited for solving optimization problems. In this talk, I’ll introduce the basic concepts behind this approach and the hardware implementation at D-Wave using superconducting qubits. I will also briefly discuss scalability, the role of coherence and showcase some of the progress D-Wave has made on these fronts. About the speaker: Rahul Deshpande is a senior experimental physicist at D-Wave, working on developing and characterizing the next generation of superconducting quantum processors. A scientist with a passion for developing new technologies, he completed his PhD in Physics at the University of Waterloo, where he studied nuclear spins in silicon with applications towards quantum computing and quantum sensing at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC).
  • 3:40 - 4:20 PM | Talk by John Donohue
    Title: Qubits 101 Location: KAIS 2020/20230 Abstract: How do we connect the quantum theory of atoms, photons, and electrons to the information processing power of quantum computing? What tools do we need and what features are we really using? In this session for beginners in quantum information science, we’ll overview how we take real quantum mechanical systems and use them to encode, manipulate, and process quantum bits. We’ll show how we can model a range of systems with the same simple linear algebra and get at the essence of what makes quantum bits more powerful than classical bits. About the speaker: Dr. John Donohue is the Senior Manager of Scientific Outreach at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC), a research institute at the University of Waterloo. John is responsible for making quantum science accessible for everyone, including through educational programs like the Undergraduate School on Experimental Quantum Information Processing (USEQIP). John earned his PhD from the University of Waterloo in 2016 for work in quantum optics.
  • 3.30 - 3:40 PM | Opening Remarks
    Location: KAIS 2020/2030
  • 10:00 - 10:45 AM | Talk by Lukas Chrostowski
    Title: Quantum Silicon Photonics Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: Photonic integrated circuits, implemented in silicon, have become a mainstream technology for providing high-speed optical communication links within data centres. Other applications include various sensors (LIDAR, biomedical, environment), optical computing, and quantum information processing. Perhaps the most ambitious application for integrated photonics is in quantum computing. Photonics can be used for the computation itself (e.g. PsiQuantum, Xanadu), or can be an enabling technology to couple between spin qubits to build scalable hybrid photonic-spin quantum processors (the SFU-UBC SiQL CFI project, Photonic Inc.). Finally, photonics can be used for what it does best – optical communications – to build quantum communication links between quantum processors and quantum sensors. This talk will discuss research to develop the ingredients necessary for these technologies. This includes novel fabrication techniques using electron beam lithography (SiEPICfab consortium), the design of devices such as single photon sources, single photon detectors, and tunable high-Q resonators for spin qubits, and building instrumentation to test these devices and circuits including cryogenic probe stations and cryogenic photonic packaging. About the speaker: Lukas Chrostowski is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of British Columbia, and co-founder of Dream Photonics Inc. Through his research in silicon photonics, optoelectronics, high-speed laser design, fabrication and test, for applications in optical communications, biophotonics, and quantum photonics, he has published more than 300 journal and conference publications. He co-authored the book “Silicon Photonics Design” (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Dr. Chrostowski was the co-director of the Advanced Materials and Process Engineering Laboratory (AMPEL) Nanofabrication Facility (ANF), 2008-2016. Dr. Chrostowski was the Program Director of the NSERC CREATE Silicon Electronic-Photonic Integrated Circuits (Si-EPIC) training program in Canada, and has been teaching numerous silicon photonics workshops and courses since 2008, which continue today as the SiEPICfab consortium. Chrostowski received the Killam Teaching Prize at the University of British Columbia in 2014, IEEE Photonics Society Technical Skills Educator Award in 2021, and IEEE Canada's J.M Ham Outstanding Engineering Educator Award in 2021. He was an elected member of the IEEE Photonics Society 2014-2016 Board of Governors. He was elected to the college of the Royal Society of Canada in 2019. Chrostowski is the Program Director for the NSERC CREATE 2020-2026 Quantum Computing program (Quantum BC), co-leading the Quantum Silicon Photonics design-fabricate-test workshop.
  • 6:30 PM - 12:00 AM | Mini-Challenges Coding Time & Pizza
    Time to solve some Mini-Challenges!
  • 9:15 - 9:55 AM | Talk by Roman Krems
    Title: Can quantum computers enhance machine learning? Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: In this talk, I will describe how quantum computing and machine learning can be combined to solve a machine learning problem that cannot be solved on a classical computer. This will illustrate the quantum advantage of quantum machine learning. I will then discuss how to build optimal quantum machine learning models for practical applications. In particular, I will show how to increase the complexity of quantum models in order to improve their ability to infer from limited data. I will conclude by a discussion of the title question. About the speaker: Roman Krems is a Professor of Chemistry and Distinguished University Scholar at the University of British Columbia. He is also a member of the computer science department at UBC and a principal investigator at theStewart Blusson Quantum Matter Institute. His work is at the intersection of quantum physics, machine learning and chemistry on problems of relevance to quantum materials and quantum technologies. He is particularly excited about applications of machine learning for solving complex quantum problems and applications of quantum hardware for machine learning. He is Fellow of the American Physical Society and Member of the College of the Royal Society of Canada.
  • 11:35 - 11:50 AM | Lightning Talk by John Donohue (IQC)
    Title: Opportunities at the Institute for Quantum Computing Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: The Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) is a research institute at the University of Waterloo advancing the field of quantum information science. We will overview opportunities for undergraduate students at IQC, including graduate programs in science, engineering, and mathematics as well as the Undergraduate School for Experimental Quantum Information Processing (USEQIP). About the speaker: Dr. John Donohue is the Senior Manager of Scientific Outreach at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC), a research institute at the University of Waterloo. John is responsible for making quantum science accessible for everyone, including through educational programs like the Undergraduate School on Experimental Quantum Information Processing (USEQIP). John earned his PhD from the University of Waterloo in 2016 for work in quantum optics.
  • UPDATED | 4:00 - 4:40 PM | Talk by Katanya Kuntz
    Title: Meet QUINT! The QEYSSat User Investigation Team - Update on the QEYSSat mission Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: I will update on Canada's first Quantum Satellite Mission - the Quantum EncrYption and Science Satellite (QEYSSat). The Canadian Space Agency is preparing to launch QEYSSat in 2025, which will circle the Earth in low-earth orbit (500 km above the ground), and measure individual packets of light (photons) sent from telescopes on the ground up to space. QEYSSat will demonstrate secure communication across Canada using quantum links, and help us explore foundational concepts in physics that cannot be tested on Earth. I will introduce our new QUINT consortium: a five Year NSERC Quantum Alliance grant to support QEYSSat science activities for the Canadian Science Team. About the speaker: Katanya Kuntz (PhD) is a Research Associate at the Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Canada, and the QEYSSat Science Team Coordinator for Canada’s first quantum satellite mission: Quantum EncrYption and Science Satellite (QEYSSat). Katanya received her PhD in Electrical Engineering (Quantum Optics) from the University of New South Wales, Australia, and BSc in Physics from the University of Calgary. She is also the co-founder and CEO of Qubo Consulting Corp., a quantum education company that teaches businesses and organizations to get them quantum literate.
  • 10:50 - 11.30 AM | Classiq workshop by Erik Garcell
    Location: KAIS 2020/2030 About the speaker: Dr. Erik Garcell is technical marketing manager at Classiq, which is revolutionizing the process of developing quantum computing software by taking quantum software to a higher level. Dr. Garcell was previously innovation product manager for IP.com and an innovation research scientist at Kodak Alaris. He has a doctorate in physics from the University of Rochester and a Master of Science in Technical Entrepreneurship & Management from the University of Rochester’s Simon School of Business.
  • 9:10 - 9:15 AM | Opening Remarks
    Location: KAIS 2020/2030
  • 4:45 - 5.25 PM | Quantum Career Panel
    Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Moderator: John Donohue Panelists: Thomas Baker, Mark Jackson, Rio Weil
  • 11:55 AM - 12.35 PM | Qiskit workshop
    Title: Qiskit workshop Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Come join the Qiskit hands-on workshop to learn the fundamentals of programming a quantum computer. Learn how to create quantum circuits visually using Circuit Composer IBM Quantum platform, and programmatically, using open source Qiskit framework. Run your circuits on quantum simulators and real quantum computers. To get the best experience out of the workshop, sign-up for a free account on IBM Quantum platform beforehand at https://quantum-computing.ibm.com/ About the speaker: Hemavathi Santhanam is an IBM Quantum Ambassador and a Qiskit Advocate. As for her day job, Hema is a Delivery Consultant at IBM Expert Labs building enterprise solutions around Data Governance and AI with IBM Cloud Pak for Data. She is a graduate in Computing and Data Analytics from Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
  • 8:30 - 9:10 AM | Registration and Snacks
    Location: KAIS 2020/2030
  • 2:20 - 3.00 PM | Talk by Peter Hoyer
    Title: The use of quantum computers in cryptography, computation, and communication Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: We discuss the use of quantum algorithms in three areas: cryptography, computations, and communication. We discuss three aspects: how quantum algorithms can help, the problems for which they can help, and the problems for which they offer no benefits. We give examples of all cases. We discuss which existing crypto-systems are vulnerable or resilient against quantum attacks. We give examples of collaborative communication tasks where quantum communication helps. We conclude by characterizing which tasks and problems are currently believed to be aided by quantum computers. About the speaker: Peter Hoyer is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Calgary. His research is on quantum algorithms, quantum complexity theory, quantum communication, and quantum cryptography. He is a co-discoverer of quantum amplitude amplification, which is a core tool in the design of quantum algorithms and protocols. He has won several student awards for his teaching in computer science. He holds a PhD from University of Southern Denmark.
  • 3:15 - 3:55 PM | Good Chemistry Workshop by Valentin Senicourt
    Title: Good Chemistry Workshop - Harnessing software for quantum computing research: an application to quantum chemistry simulations Location: KAIS 2020/2030 About the workshop: The field of quantum computing has gained a lot of momentum, and software has been key in both training a global quantum workforce and propelling the research community. Our ability to use and design tools harnessing a constant stream of innovation scattered across many software projects, widely led by enthusiastic open-source communities, plays an essential role in pushing the state of the art. A lot of work in both hardware and algorithm development remains necessary in order to reliably apply quantum computing to solve practical use cases. Applied research in the NISQ era requires software able to express complex workflows making use cases amenable to current devices and simulators, while providing researchers with the ability to explore new avenues and integrate their innovations. It requires the development of software that can harness the latest innovations to keep up with the state of the art. In this talk, Valentin Senicourt discusses how Good Chemistry is tackling this challenge in the simulation of chemical systems, through the open-source project Tangelo, a python package enabling quantum chemistry workflows on quantum computers and simulators. The content of this session is applicable to fields other than chemistry simulations, and no background in chemistry is required. About the speaker: Valentin Senicourt is the Quantum Software Lead at Good Chemistry. He leads the development of Tangelo, their open-source python package enabling quantum chemistry simulations on quantum computers. Formerly a mathematics teacher, he then started a career in numerical modeling and High-Performance Computing, spanning 10 years of international experience in various fields (oil and gas, finance, medical imaging, chemistry…), and has been part of the quantum computing community for 5 years. Although he is fond of advanced computing technologies, Valentin has a pragmatic approach to problem solving and believes those tools are simply a means to an end: collaborating with other human beings to tackle challenging problems is what drives him.
  • 5:30 - 6:30 PM | IQC Pop-Up Exhibition & Poster Session & Networking
    Location: KAIS 2020/2030
  • 1.35 - 2.15 PM | Talk by Thomas Baker
    Title: Information Theory in Quantum Mechanics Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: Whether making a call on your cellphone or encrypting information to send to someone, information theory plays a critical role in both secret codes and making sure messages get from a sender to a receiver. There is a deep connection with the several fields in physics and information theory. The question I cover in this talk is how information theory plays a role in quantum physics. Inherently, quantum mechanics is uncertain, but we can quantify exactly how uncertain we are. By assigning a definitive meaning to the entropy in physics, we discover a pathway to generating algorithms that solve quantum systems. In this talk, I discuss how formulations of the density matrix, which is used to compute the quantum entanglement in a system can play a crucial role in algorithms for both classical and quantum computers. About the speaker: Thomas E. Baker holds a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Quantum Computing for Modelling of Molecules and Materials in the Department of Physics & Astronomy and also the Department of Chemistry at the University of Victoria. He is also an affiliate member of the Centre for Advanced Materials and Related Technologies (CAMTEC) at the University of Victoria. His research is focused on the design and use of a quantum computer, with research methods and techniques spanning all areas of quantum computing. He has a broad background in density functional theory, quantum algorithms, and entanglement renormalization methods. He is the lead-developer of DMRjulia, a computational library for entanglement renormalization. In 2021, he was a Fulbright U.S. Scholar at the University of York in the United Kingdom. From 2017-2020, Prof. Baker was the Prized Postdoctoral Scholar in Quantum Sciences and Technology at Institut quantique à l'Université de Sherbrooke. He is also the recipient of the Pat Beckman Memorial Scholar for the ARCS Foundation during his doctoral studies. While attending the California State University, Long Beach, he earned the Philip J. Old scholarship and sole graduate research fellowship. He has won 7 first-place speaking awards, including the Kennedy Reed Award for Best Theoretical Research by a Graduate Student. He also won the statewide California Student Research Competition in 2012. He wrote scripts for The Loh Down on Science on National Public Radio. Prof. Baker is a member of the education committee for the NSERC CREATE program in Quantum Computing affiliated with Quantum BC. He is the Principal Investigator of the quantum photonics, algorithms, light-matter interactions for technology (QuALITy) collaboration at the University of Victoria. He remains committed to building a diverse research group capable of handling the multitude of challenges related to his wide research interests. He is interested in working with a wide variety of students from all backgrounds.
  • 12:05 - 12:20 PM | Lightning Talk by Jane Dong (IBM)
    Title: Getting Started with Quantum Computing Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: Curious about IBM's Quantum ecosystem and development roadmap? Come learn more about the IBM Quantum Network, Qiskit community and exciting offerings that can empower you with the knowledge and resources you need to begin your quantum computing journey. About the speaker: Jane Dong is an IBM Quantum Ambassador and Digital Enablement Leader for Hybrid Cloud Services. Jane graduated from the University of Toronto specializing in Physics and Mathematics with high distinction. She has solutioned and delivered enterprise level digital solutions for clients across North America. Outside of her Quantum Ambassador role, Jane and her team focus on creating digital, emerging tech and hybrid cloud solutions consulting works the following streams: Solution Envisioning, Proof-of-concept Development, Production Ready Pilot development services for clients in Energy Utilities, Retail, Engineering & Construction, FSS and Public Sectors.
  • 11:25 - 11:40 AM | Lightning Talk by Anna Dyring (CQIQC)
    Title: Quantum Careers Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: I will talk broadly about quantum career paths and how CQIQC supports students through a range of learning and research opportunities in quantum science and technology. I will also share some observations and advice that may help anyone interested in exploring a career in the exciting and growing quantum sector. My goal is to inform, inspire, and challenge. About the speaker: Anna Dyring is the Quantum Strategic Initiative Lead at the Centre for Quantum Information and Quantum Control (CQIQC), UofT’s quantum centre with more than 30 research groups working both theoretically and experimentally on a range of quantum topics. Anna’s previous roles include project/product manager in several aerospace, technical consulting and biotechnology companies, where she led complex product development and delivery projects. She holds an MSc in Engineering Physics from Uppsala University, Sweden and a PhD in High Energy (Particle) Physics from Uppsala University and CERN. Anna has a broad interest in science, technology and the arts, and enjoys working at the intersection of academia, industry and the public sphere.
  • 3:30 - 4.00 PM | Award Ceremony & Closing Remarks
    Location: KAIS 2020/2030
  • 11:05 - 11:20 AM | Talk by Erik Garcell (Classiq)
    Title: Classiq and the Future of Quantum Computing Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: About the speaker: Dr. Erik Garcell is technical marketing manager at Classiq, which is revolutionizing the process of developing quantum computing software by taking quantum software to a higher level. Dr. Garcell was previously innovation product manager for IP.com and an innovation research scientist at Kodak Alaris. He has a doctorate in physics from the University of Rochester and a Master of Science in Technical Entrepreneurship & Management from the University of Rochester’s Simon School of Business.
  • 8:30 - 9:20 AM | Registration
    Location: KAIS 2020/2030
  • 10:15 -11:00 AM | Keynote Talk by Anne Broadbent
    Title: Quantum Unclonability and Cryptography Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: According to the unclonability property of quantum information, it is not possible, in general, to duplicate an unknown quantum state. Quantum cryptography is the science of communication and computation in the presence of an adversary. Because quantum adversaries are also bound by the unclonability property, this creates a myriad of opportunities for quantum cryptographers. We will discuss how unclonability permeates quantum cryptography: from the early findings on quantum money and quantum key distribution, to recent work on unclonable quantum encryption, certified deletion, and unclonable software. About the speaker: Prof. Broadbent is a Full Professor at the University of Ottawa, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, with cross appointments to the Department of Physics and to the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Prof. Broadbent holds the University of Ottawa Research Chair in Quantum Information and Cryptography. Her research relates to cryptography, communication, and information processing in a quantum world. Prof. Broadbent’s research is recognized by multiple awards and accolades, including the University of Ottawa Young Researcher of the Year Award (2019), the Ontario Early Researcher Award (2016), the André Aisenstadt Prize in Mathematics (2016), the John Charles Polanyi Prize (2010) and the NSERC Doctoral Prize (2009).
  • 9:20 - 9:30 AM | Opening Remarks
    Location: KAIS 2020/2030
  • 9:30 - 10:10 AM | Talk by Hoi-Kwon (Kero) Lau
    Title: Beyond qubits: a glimpse at bosonic quantum technologies Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: While qubits are the basic unit in most quantum information devices and applications, there is another class of quantum system that offers infinite states per degree of freedom. Bosonic systems, in this respect, are everywhere and provide loads of practical advantages. In this talk, I will introduce the basics and features of bosonic quantum technologies. I will also briefly introduce our group’s effort in engineering bosonic quantum gates. About the speaker: Kero is a theorist working on the interface of quantum optics and quantum information. After getting his PhD from University of Toronto, Kero was awarded the Croucher Fellowship, and later worked as a postdoc at Max Planck Institute and University of Chicago. In 2020, Kero joined the SFU Department of Physics as an assistant professor. He is also the Canada Research Chair in Quantum Information Science and an affiliate fellow of Quantum Algorithm Institute. Kero focuses on studying the physics of Bosonic quantum systems and how they can be used for information processing. His ultimate goal is to bring quantum technologies to reality.
  • 11:45 AM - 12:00 PM | Lightning Talk by Ara Ghukasyan (Agnostiq)
    Title: Agnostiq: Time Series Anomaly Detection with Quantum Variational Rewinding Location: KAIS 2020/2030 About the talk: A variety of important problems in healthcare, finance, and technology rely on detecting strange, potentially dangerous, sequences of events among normal everyday occurrences. Formally, this is precisely the notion of time series anomaly detection (TAD). Rather than flagging individual events that deviate from the norm – a less difficult problem – a more salient goal here is to identify several events that represent anomalous behaviour when considered in context. In this talk, we present a highly scalable quantum machine learning algorithm for TAD with freely available NISQ hardware. This algorithm, which we refer to as Quantum Variational Rewinding (QVR), relies on training a family of parameterized unitary time-devolution operators to cluster normal time series instances that are encoded within quantum states. In other words, we train a quantum model to “rewind” series-encoding states to initial states which are similar for normal time series, but differ for abnormal ones. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the efficacy of this algorithm on the real-world problem of identifying anomalous transactions in cryptocurrency market data. About the speaker: Ara Ghukasyan is a Research Software Engineer at Agnostiq Inc. (agnostiq.ai). He holds an undergraduate degree in Mathematics & Physics and a Ph.D. in Engineering Physics from McMaster University. Before working in quantum computing, he researched semiconductor hardware and atomistic simulations of nanoscale heat transport. Ara’s casual interests include music, film, and broad topics in science and computation. Ara also enjoys an avid interest in electric guitar and bass.
  • 1:45 - 2:25 PM | Talk by Rogerio De Sousa
    Title: From Quantum Mechanics to Quantum Computers Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: Quantum behavior can be exploited to create a computer that works with superpositions and entangled states of zeros and ones. This so-called quantum computer is exponentially faster than conventional computers for certain problems, most notably the ones requiring linear algebra (e.g. matrix diagonalization and solution of linear systems) and simulation of quantum systems such as molecules and materials. I will give an informal overview of how quantum computer hardware can be made, using "artificial atoms" as quantum bits (qubits) based on superconducting chips. I will show how you can access these systems over the cloud to run your own experiments, and how we use this to teach quantum computing to second year undergraduate students in science and engineering at University of Victoria. Finally, I will give an overview of the problems we are working on in my research group, related to understanding and mitigating the impact of noise in quantum hardware and software. About the speaker: My research is on how to design quantum hardware with less noise, with particular focus on photons and superconducting materials. More recently we also became involved with research related to how to implement quantum algorithms with the cloud-based quantum computers from IBM and D-Wave. I have collaborators at other universities and national labs in multiple countries (Brazil, Canada, France, USA, etc). I have an ongoing collaboration with scientists at D-Wave Systems Inc., where we investigate the sources of noise and how to reduce them in the D-Wave quantum processor. I am also an academic fellow of the British Columbia Quantum Algorithms Institute, based at the Surrey campus of Simon Fraser University. With leading companies in our area (1Qbit, D-Wave, Photonic), our province recognizes the opportunity to develop a quantum ecosystem that can compete worldwide in the development of this exciting new technology. This includes a multi-university effort to form more professionals with expertise in quantum hardware and software. For more information on what is going on in B.C. related to quantum computing, check out our Quantum-BC webpage, http://quantum-bc.ca/ .
  • 2:30 - 3:30 PM | Talk by Joseph Salfi
    Title: Primer on Spin Qubits: State-of-the-art and Challenges Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: Spin qubits in group-IV materials are an appealing system for building quantum technologies because of their long coherence times and compatibility with industrial manufacturing technologies. The small size of spin qubits is both a blessing and a curse. The small size means that large numbers of qubits necessary to build fault-tolerant quantum computers could in principle be integrated onto a single chip. However, spin qubits are so small that fabricating and controlling them has proven to be more difficult than, for example, superconducting qubits. In this talk I will describe recent progress in an emerging system, spin-orbit qubits in Group-IV materials, which could offer a means to resolve some of these challenges, and in addition, to streamline simulation of materials and chemistry compared to competing systems. I will describe our ongoing efforts to develop spin qubits and superconducting technologies both to explore fundamental physics and build scalable quantum technologies. About the speaker: Joseph Salfi completed a PhD at the University of Toronto in 2011. From 2011 to 2015 he was a postdoc and from 2016 to 2018 was junior faculty at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) and Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, the international epicentre for silicon based qubits. In 2019, he joined the University of British Columbia as faculty. His research interests are in the physics and technology of spin-based quantum computers and quantum simulators.
  • 7:30 PM | Networking Dinner
    Expect an enriching networking experience with dinner to conclude Day 1 of Q-SITE! Connect with fellow quantum enthusiasts, share insights, and forge new collaborations over a delicious meal. Location: Bahen Lobby
  • 2:30 PM | Opening Ceremony
    A quantum leap for ideas to converge, meaningful connections to emerge and memories to make, over the next 3 days! Location: KP108
  • 1:30 PM | Registration and Snacks
    Join us for a delightful pre-conference snack session! Savour delicious bites, mingle with fellow attendees, and fuel up for an inspiring event ahead. Location: Koffler House Lobby
  • 3:30 PM | Aephraim Steinberg - University of Toronto
    Title: Information in Quantum Mechanics Location: KP108 Abstract: As is now well-known, quantum mechanics offers new powerful ways to transmit and process information (quantum cryptography, quantum computing) – but at the same time, the information-theoretic perspective offers a fascinating new window on the rules which govern our universe. In this talk, I will first introduce, at an undergraduate level, some of the surprises revealed by asking how much information a quantum system can carry, or how much information it takes to describe a quantum system. In particular, I will touch on the striking examples of quantum teleportation and quantum error correction, before discussing an experiment we carried out here at Toronto on “quantum data compression.” I will conclude by shifting gears to ask a more philosophical question, about how much one can know about a quantum system at all, and showing a few results from our most recent experiments asking “how long does an atom spend inside a forbidden region?” and “how long do photons spend trapped inside atoms?” About the Speaker: Aephraim Steinberg is a University Professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto. He is also a founding member and past director of the Centre for Quantum Information and Quantum Control (CQIQC), and currently Director of the CIFAR programme in Quantum Information Science. Dr. Steinberg received his undergraduate degree from Yale University, where he worked with Ed Hinds, before spending a year as a research assistant in Serge Haroche’s group at the Ecole Normale Supérieure. He went on to work with Ray Chiao at the University of California at Berkeley, carrying out his Ph.D. research on superluminal tunneling. He then held post-doctoral fellowships at the Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel (Université de Paris VI) working in Elisabeth Giacobino & Claude Fabre’s group; and the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology, where he learned the ropes of laser cooling in the group of Bill Phillips. He joined U of T’s Physics Department in 1996. He has won numerous awards, ranging from the APS doctoral thesis prize in AMO Physics to a Steacie Fellowship. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Physics (UK), the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America, and the Royal Society of Canada. Dr. Steinberg’s interests focus on foundational issues in quantum mechanics, as well as their application to tasks ranging from information processing to precision measurement. His experimental program is two-pronged, using atoms cooled down to a billionth of a degree above absolute zero as well as entangled photon pairs, to study issues such as quantum measurement and the nature of the past in quantum mechanics, quantum information & computation, tunneling times, and the control and characterization of novel quantum states. His group’s Science paper on using weak measurement to observe the "average trajectories” of single photons in a two-slit interferometer was selected by Physics World as the "breakthrough of 2011.” In 2014, his paper on quantum data compression was listed as one of the top 10 breakthroughs of the year.
  • 5:30 PM | Lab Tours
    Welcome to the University of Toronto's research lab tour hosted by Q-SITE, where you'll gain firsthand insight into cutting-edge research and innovations. Led by highly experienced professors, this tour promises an exceptional and enlightening experience. The professors and grad students leading the tour are more than happy to answer any questions you may have about their research, methodologies, or the broader implications of their work. Through this tour, you'll not only gain valuable knowledge about various research domains but also witness the passion and dedication of these academics as they strive to make meaningful contributions to their respective fields. Location: KP108 Professors: Sorin Voinigescu Guide: Suyash Pati Tripathi Research Interests: CMOS Quantum Dots in FDSOI and FinFET for Spin-Qubit Quantum Processors Lab: BA5159 Professor: Li Qian Guide: Reem Mandil and Alex Greenwood Research Interests: Experimental Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) and Fiber-Based Entangled Photon Sources Lab: SF4101 Professor: Boris Braverman Research Interests: Quantum Optics and Condensed Matter Physics Lab: MP1108A Professors: Aephraim Steinberg Guide: Andy Jiao Research Interests: Laser-Cooling Lab Lab: MP054 Professors: Aephraim Steinberg Guide: Batuhan Yilmaz Research Interests: Entangled-Photons Lab Lab: MP056 Professor: Sergio de la Barrera Guide: Nicco Spano Research Interests: Superconductivity and Condensed Matter Physics Lab: MP089
  • 5:05 PM | Hayley McKay - Mitacs
    Title: Supporting the Canadian Quantum Ecosystem Through Collaborative R&D Partnerships. Location: KP108 Abstract: Mitacs is a national, independent not-for-profit organization with a mandate to create and support R&D collaborations between academic institutions and industry partners. Through the various funding programs which will be outlined in this talk, Mitacs provides experiential learning opportunities for students to take part in innovative R&D activities with partner organizations in the form of paid internships. Mitacs is especially committed to fostering growth in the Canadian quantum ecosystem, with exclusive programming available for collaborations that develop talent and new ventures in the quantum sector. About the Speaker: Hayley McKay is a Business Development Advisor with Mitacs, a national not-for-profit organization that provides R&D funding to support academic-industry collaborations and international academic travel. Hayley works closely with professors and students at the University of Toronto and industry partners across the country to build mutually beneficial, long-term research partnerships that drive innovation in Canada. With a background in molecular genetics and science communication, Hayley is passionate about interdisciplinary learning and turning academic research into innovative solutions for today’s societal challenges.
  • 2:45 PM | Alex Greenwood
    Title: Quantum Computing: A Brief Introduction Location: KP108 Abstract: Over the past few decades, great strides have been made in the development of noisy intermediate-scale quantum (NISQ) devices for their promised applications in fields including, but not limited to, cryptography, physical simulation, and machine learning. This talk aims to elucidate the current state of the art of quantum computing: its significance, challenges, and an overview of hardware platforms that are available today. No prior knowledge of quantum technologies is expected of attendees. About the Speaker: Alexander Greenwood received his BASc (with honours) and MASc in from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Toronto in 2021 and 2023 respectively. His master's thesis was concerned with the detection of multipartite entangled states using entanglement witnesses derived with Support Vector Machines (SVMs). Alex is currently a PhD candidate under the supervision of Prof. Li Qian and serves as the vice president of the Optica student chapter at the University of Toronto.
  • 4:20 PM | Hoi Kwong Lo - University of Toronto
    Title: The Quantum Threat to Cyber-security and How to Counter it Location: KP108 Abstract: Cryptographically relevant quantum computers (CRQC) can break standard encryption schemes and forge digital identity and digital signatures, thus creating chaos in our financial transactions and threatening the security of our critical infrastructure. Large IT corporations such as Google and IBM are racing to build CRQC, possibly by 2030. Indeed, the “harvest now and decrypt later” attack may threaten our communication security even today. In this talk, I will review the quantum threat to cyber-security. Moreover, I will briefly review the three classes of methods to counter this quantum threat including quantum-resistant conventional cryptography (often called post-quantum cryptography (PQC)), quantum key distribution (QKD), and pre-shared keys (PSK). I argue that they form the three pillars needed to address this immense security challenge. About the Speaker: Prof. Hoi-Kwong Lo is a Professor of Physics and Electrical and Computing Engineering at the U. of T. He is also a co-founder and CTO of Quantum Bridge. He received his B.A. in Mathematics from Cambridge University and Ph.D. in Physics at Caltech in 1989 and 1994 respectively. After working at institutions such as the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS), Princeton, New Jersey, USA, Hewlett-Packard Lab, Bristol, UK, and MagiQ Technologies, Inc., New York, NY, he became an Associate Professor at the U. of Toronto in 2003 and was promoted to Full Professor in 2009. Prof. Lo performs research in the theory and experiment of quantum cryptography. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and Optica Fellow, and he has received numerous awards including the Outstanding Young Researcher Award (OYRA) by the OCPA (the International Organization of Chinese Physicists and Astronomers) in 2003, the 2022 CAP-INO Medal for Outstanding Achievement in Applied Photonics and the 2023 IEEE Photonics Society Quantum Electronics Award.
  • 9 AM | Registration and Snacks
    Join us once again in the Bahen Lobby for a quantum-powered snack break before an electrifying Day 2 at Q-SITE! Location: Bahen Centre for Information Technology
  • 10:10 AM | Reem Mandil - University of Toronto
    Title: A Brief History of Quantum Cryptography Location: BA1130 Abstract: The contest between code-makers and code-breakers has existed for centuries. Now, quantum mechanics is a powerful tool at the code-maker’s disposal. That is because quantum cryptography promises unconditional security in the face of an all-powerful adversary—in theory. This talk will explore the history of using quantum states (primarily photons) to encode and communicate information such that malicious activity can be detected, with a focus on a particular application of quantum cryptography called quantum key distribution (QKD). About the Speaker: Reem is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto. Her research focuses on experimental twin-field QKD and QKD networks. She is co-supervised by Prof. Hoi-Kwong Lo and Prof. Li Qian.
  • 6:30 PM | Social Night
    Unwind and bond quantum-style at our Q-SITE Social Night! Enjoy delicious pizzas, face fun challenges and forge lasting connections. Join us for an unforgettable evening of networking and laughter. Location: BA2155
  • 2:35 PM | John Donohue - Institute for Quantum Computing [Vancouver]
    Title: Opportunities at the Institute for Quantum Computing Location: BA1130 Abstract: The Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) is a research institute at the University of Waterloo advancing the field of quantum information science. We will overview opportunities for undergraduate students at IQC, including graduate programs in science, engineering, and mathematics as well as the Undergraduate School for Experimental Quantum Information Processing (USEQIP). About the Speaker: Dr. John Donohue is the Senior Manager of Scientific Outreach at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC), a research institute at the University of Waterloo. John is responsible for making quantum science accessible for everyone, including through educational programs like the Undergraduate School on Experimental Quantum Information Processing (USEQIP). John earned his PhD from the University of Waterloo in 2016 for work in quantum optics.
  • 1:50 PM | Dr. Erik Garcell - Classiq [Workshop]
    Title: Mastering Quantum Computing with Classiq: A Hands-On Workshop Location: BA1130 About the Speaker: Dr. Erik Garcell is technical marketing manager at Classiq, which is revolutionizing the process of developing quantum computing software by taking quantum software to a higher level. Dr. Garcell was previously innovation product manager for IP.com and an innovation research scientist at Kodak Alaris. He has a doctorate in physics from the University of Rochester and a Master of Science in Technical Entrepreneurship & Management from the University of Rochester’s Simon School of Business.
  • 3:55 PM | Alvaro Ballon Bordo - Xanadu
    Title: Introduction to Quantum Machine Learning using PennyLane Location: BA1130 Abstract: The purpose of this session is to learn PennyLane using a hands-on approach. First, we will become familiar with PennyLane's paradigms for simulating simple quantum circuits. Building on this knowledge, we create our first variational circuit and optimize a cost function to find the ground energy of a Hamiltonian. Finally, and if time permits it, we build a variational quantum classifier from scratch to showcase the machine learning applications of quantum computing. About the Speaker: Alvaro Ballon Bordo holds a Physics PhD from the University of Waterloo. He is currently a Quantum Computing Educator at Xanadu, where he creates educational content to make the discipline of quantum programming accessible to the community at large. His main interests include the foundations of quantum mechanics, quantum information theory, and the near-term applications of quantum computing.
  • 11:50 AM | Group Photo
    Gather at the Bahen waterfall to immortalize the spirit of Q-SITE and capture it in a group photo! Location: Bahen Centre for Information Technology
  • 5:30 PM | Grad Fair + Poster Sessions
    Explore groundbreaking research, gain insightful knowledge about your future in quantum and make meaningful connections all at Q-SITE's Grad Fair + Poster Session in the Bahen Lobby. Location: Bahen Centre for Information Technology Student: Cristina Rodriguez Title: Platonic Ququart Benchmarking. Abstract: The study of 4-level quantum systems, or ququarts, is of paramount importance in the field of quantum computing. These systems exhibit unique quantum behavior and possess certain advantages over qubits, like increased information capacity and quantum advantage in specific algorithms. It is therefore essential to explore the potential of these types of systems. Understanding and characterizing their behavior through benchmarking protocols are fundamental steps toward this goal. Randomized benchmarking has emerged as a valuable tool for assessing and mitigating errors in quantum gates. In this project, we implement character randomized benchmarking within a 4-level quantum system to assess and mitigate errors in quantum gates. Unlike the standard randomized benchmarking, character randomized benchmarking is essential for systems with complex decay processes. Our approach involves implementing three distinct gate groups based on the symmetries of platonic solids: the tetrahedral, octahedral, and icosahedral groups. These groups present unique challenges due to the non-multiplicity-free nature of their irreducible representations. The experimental implementation is carried out using liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to control and manipulate quantum states within the 4-level system. Liquid-state NMR offers reliable control over quantum states allowing us to manipulate our 4-level system with precision. Our work not only highlights the significance of character randomized benchmarking in evaluating and enhancing the reliability of quantum gates but also emphasizes the relevance of studying 4-level quantum systems, which are integral to the advancement of quantum computing technology with potential applications across a wide range of scientific and computational fields. Student: Anton Sugolov Title: Quantum Circuit Architecture Selection via Local Optimization towards Quantum Machine Learning of Chemical Bond Dissociation Energy. Abstract: Quantum machine learning (QML) or variational quantum algorithms (VQA) for regression are a growing research area with immense impact for chemical applications. The trainability and expressibility of quantum regression models are determined by the sequence of gate operations (ansatz) of the model circuit implementation. Standard circuit ansatze are used for QML, yet the optimal ansatz is completely regression task dependent. We propose a local search approach towards task-specific ansatz selection from a candidate ansatz. Given a candidate ansatz: (i) the sequence of gate operations is probabilistically altered to yield a sample of similar ansatze, (ii) the sample is trained and top circuits are selected, (iii) new circuits are re-sampled from top circuits. The process proceeds iteratively and is parametrized by (i) probabilities of gate changes occuring (iteration-level change) and (ii) decay in change probability (global deviation from candidate). Current literature randomly samples from the search space of ansatze and involves training a model (NSGA-II, GNN) to learn performance given structure of the sampled circuits (Y. Du, 2022 and Z. He, 2023). Our framework is more scalable to larger ansatze since it avoids sparse sampling, circuit representation learning, and meta-learning of models. Student: Nicholas Taylor Title: Quantum Machine Learning for Regression Tasks in Computational Chemistry. Abstract: The rapid growth of quantum computing has seen a rise in the development of applicable near-term quantum algorithms. A promising candidate to run on current noisy intermediate-scale quantum (NISQ) hardware is quantum machine learning (QML). Parameterized quantum circuits can be learned as models in a hybrid classical-quantum approach. It has been shown that QML models may need less training data to generalize compared to classical methods. Although QML has been explored largely within classification tasks, regression tasks have received much less attention. Existing studies have only utilized few qubits and lack relevant practical applications. We will discuss our work on the development and comparisons of QML models for highly desired prediction of chemical properties such as bond dissociation energies and barrier height energies. Our work investigates the trainability, expressibility, and generalization capability of various quantum models for the purpose of regression of molecular properties. We benchmark various encoding and variational subcircuits to examine their effects on our specific task. Additionally, the effects of repeated layers of encoding are explored and being found to provide better fitting models across our trials. Our work also provides a benchmark against classical machine learning models and implications of using error mitigation techniques for QML. Student: Katherine Latosinsky Title: A Tunnel Oscillating Diode Circuit for Measuring Superconductivity. Abstract: This research project involves designing a tunnel diode oscillator circuit for contactless measurement of the London penetration depth in superconducting materials. A tunnel diode operates on the principle of quantum mechanical tunnelling, allowing thermally excited electrons to tunnel through the thin depletion region at low voltages. This causes a peak in the diode's I-V characteristic followed by a region of negative differential resistance. This unique quantum behaviour allows the creation of an LC circuit with a stable resonance at GHz frequencies. When a material sample is placed inside a connected inductor, the resonance frequency becomes dependent on the electromagnetic properties of the material, characterized by its London penetration depth. This measurement technique has been successfully applied by several research groups globally. It avoids the need to directly attach electrodes to the sample, and is well-suited for our intended application measuring samples with sub-millimeter diameters subjected to extreme pressures in a diamond anvil cell. The poster will primarily detail the physics of the tunnel diode that makes this circuit possible, as well as the circuit operation. This provides an excellent example of a practical application of quantum tunneling. There will also be some discussion of the intended measurements and applications in the field of condensed matter physics. Student: Adam Martinez Title: Photoluminescence Excitation Spectroscopy of Tin Vacancy Centres for Quantum Networks Abstract: Characterization of group IV defects diamond's electronic structure is an important first step in determining their applicability as a quantum information processing platform. Defect centres platform have long coherence times, robust to noisy environments, and are easily scalable and integratable with semiconductor technologies, making them an attractive candidate. When manufacturing this defect, the energy transitions can substantially vary due to crystal strain and external magnetic fields. Hence, photoillumence excitation spectroscopy (PLE) is required to characterize the two spin conserving optical active transitions of interest. Presented here is the design and assessment of a PLE optical system for SnV centres in diamond. A tunable 1240nm CW external cavity semiconductor laser coupled to a second harmonic generator (SHG) is used to scan over 20 GHz with up to 1 MHz resolution. Careful attention to establishing a mod hop free scanning range with frequency and power stabilization techniques are discussed. A second non resonant 520nm diode CW laser is also used and optical focused into a Montana cryostat at 4K. Emitted photons are collected using a single-photon avalanche detector and the spectrum analyzed. Introduction of acousto-optic modulators for power stabilization and control between 520nm and 620nm as a possible next step in discussed. Student: Nishaant Jacobus Title: Controlling Non-Equilibrium Steady States via Environmental Tuning. Abstract: While isolated quantum systems undergo unitary evolution as described by the Schrödinger Equation, these dynamics are significantly altered when these systems interact with their environment. Elucidating the behavior of these open quantum systems has many applications, including the realization of quantum computing and understanding the role of quantum mechanics in biological processes such as light harvesting and vision. In particular, environmental influences allow these systems to attain non-equilibrium steady states (NESS) that show strong dependencies on the properties of the closed system. For instance, we have shown computationally that the quantum yield of the photoisomerization of rhodopsin, the first step of vision, has a sensitive dependence on closed system parameters such as the electronic energy gap. Further studies on a broader family of models such as the Rabi Model showed that this sensitivity is a general property of open systems, with spikes in flux rates correlated with low-energy avoided crossings. Given this strong dependence of the NESS on the properties of the system, a natural follow-up question is whether the NESS exhibits a similar dependence on the environment; namely, for a fixed system, can we control the steady state by tuning the system-environment coupling? To investigate this question, we numerically examine the steady state properties of exciton transport in the Holstein Model, a chain of sites coupled to local harmonic modes that could represent scenarios such as energy transport in polymers. We find that the steady-state exciton populations can be controlled by tuning the dissipation strength of the environment, and we note an interesting parallel between this steady state behavior and the transient dynamics of the system. These results suggest that it may be possible to optimize the performance of a quantum system by engineering the environment appropriately.
  • 1:00 PM | Lukas Chrostowski - University of British Columbia [Vancouver]
    Title: Quantum Silicon Photonics Location: BA1130 Abstract: Photonic integrated circuits, implemented in silicon, have become a mainstream technology for providing high-speed optical communication links within data centres. Other applications include various sensors (LIDAR, biomedical, environment), optical computing, and quantum information processing. Perhaps the most ambitious application for integrated photonics is in quantum computing. Photonics can be used for the computation itself (e.g. PsiQuantum, Xanadu), or can be an enabling technology to couple between spin qubits to build scalable hybrid photonic-spin quantum processors (the SFU-UBC SiQL CFI project, Photonic Inc.). Finally, photonics can be used for what it does best – optical communications – to build quantum communication links between quantum processors and quantum sensors. This talk will discuss research to develop the ingredients necessary for these technologies. This includes novel fabrication techniques using electron beam lithography (SiEPICfab consortium), the design of devices such as single photon sources, single photon detectors, and tunable high-Q resonators for spin qubits, and building instrumentation to test these devices and circuits including cryogenic probe stations and cryogenic photonic packaging. About the Speaker: Lukas Chrostowski is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of British Columbia, and co-founder of Dream Photonics Inc. Through his research in silicon photonics, optoelectronics, high-speed laser design, fabrication and test, for applications in optical communications, biophotonics, and quantum photonics, he has published more than 300 journal and conference publications. He co-authored the book “Silicon Photonics Design” (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Dr. Chrostowski was the co-director of the Advanced Materials and Process Engineering Laboratory (AMPEL) Nanofabrication Facility (ANF), 2008-2016. Dr. Chrostowski was the Program Director of the NSERC CREATE Silicon Electronic-Photonic Integrated Circuits (Si-EPIC) training program in Canada, and has been teaching numerous silicon photonics workshops and courses since 2008, which continue today as the SiEPICfab consortium. Chrostowski received the Killam Teaching Prize at the University of British Columbia in 2014, IEEE Photonics Society Technical Skills Educator Award in 2021, and IEEE Canada's J.M Ham Outstanding Engineering Educator Award in 2021. He was an elected member of the IEEE Photonics Society 2014-2016 Board of Governors. He was elected to the college of the Royal Society of Canada in 2019. Chrostowski is the Program Director for the NSERC CREATE 2020-2026 Quantum Computing program (Quantum BC), co-leading the Quantum Silicon Photonics design-fabricate-test workshop.
  • 4:45 PM | Upper Years Talk
    Unlock your future in the quantum realm with these upper year students as they delve into their journey navigating the space for the first time! Location: BA1160 Moderator: Vivek Dhande About the Moderator: Vivek Dhande is a University of Toronto BASc Engineering Science student specializing in Engineering Physics. His research specializes in DFT simulation of scaled semiconductor quantum dot devices in production FinFET and FDSOI CMOS technologies for spin-qubit quantum computing. Vivek is currently completing his PEY Co-Op at Xanadu as a Tools intern, supporting various hardware simulation packages. Vivek also leads the University of Toronto Quantum Computing (UTQC) club, where he continues to give the qLearn Quantum Hardware lecture series and organize student initiatives for spreading undergraduate quantum awareness at UofT. He is also the co-chair of the Q-SITE conference and UofT's representing member of Qubit by Qubit’s University Quantum Network. Speaker: Reem Mandil About the Speaker: Reem is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto. Her research focuses on experimental twin-field QKD and QKD networks. She is co-supervised by Prof. Hoi-Kwong Lo and Prof. Li Qian. Speaker: Noorain Noorani About the Speaker: Noorain Noorani is an Associate Data Scientist Researcher at the Bank of Canada's Quantum Lab for Advanced Analytics. He graduated with a degree in Engineering Physics from Carleton University in April 2023 and began his journey with the Bank as an intern in September 2021, transitioning to a full-time role in May 2022 while completing his studies. Notably, Noorain led a collaborative project with Carleton University and the Bank of Canada, using quantum computing to solve differential equations found in both physics and economics. While at the Bank Noorain has worked on a broad range of topics including: Quantum Natural Language Processing to classify receipt descriptions that can be used better predict inflation, using quantum machine learning for anomaly detection in time series data, and the use of quantum annealers to optimize payments systems between financial institutions. Speaker: Danial Motlagh About the Speaker: Danial Motlagh, a Computer Science undergrad at the University of Toronto, is riding the quantum wave and loving every qubit of it! He's been dabbling in all things quantum — from algorithms and chemistry to machine learning. He's been doing quantum computing research with Dr. Nathan Wiebe & Dr. Alan Aspuru Guzik at U of T while further cementing his presence beyond the academic sphere. He completed a quantum machine learning internship at Zapata, and then joined Xanadu's residency program this summer after which he got an offer to join Xanadu as a Quantum Algorithms Scientist this fall where he works to develop new and better quantum algorithms for simulating molecules and materials. Now, he's juggling algorithms by day and textbooks by night as he wraps up his degree. Speaker: Viki Prasad About the Speaker: Dr. Viki Kumar Prasad is currently appointed as a postdoctoral research fellow in the Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. His research focuses on methodological developments at the intersection of quantum computing, machine learning, and computational chemistry, funded by the Data Science Institute at the University of Toronto. Dr. Prasad holds a Ph.D. in theoretical and quantum chemistry from the University of British Columbia.
  • 11:00 AM | David Gosset - University of Waterloo
    Title: Classical Simulation Algorithms versus Quantum Computers Location: BA1130 Abstract: In the long run, large-scale quantum computers may be built that are capable of implementing quantum algorithms that achieve dramatic speedups for certain tasks. Quantum computers that exist today are restricted in their capabilities and understanding if and how they can outperform classical computers is an ongoing research effort. In this talk I will describe some recent work that has developed new tools for classical simulation of restricted types of quantum computations and how they have helped refine our understanding of the boundary between quantum and classical computation. About the Speaker: David Gosset is a quantum computer scientist who is interested in quantum algorithms and complexity theory. He has worked on theoretical questions relevant to small quantum computers, including understanding the computational power of constant-depth quantum circuits and the limits of classical simulation algorithms. He has also investigated the computational power and complexity of quantum many-body systems, and the application of physics-inspired tools from these areas to quantum computer science. He is a faculty member at the Institute for Quantum Computing at the University of Waterloo, associate faculty at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, and a fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.
  • 2:55 PM | Hemavathi Santhanam - IBM Quantum & Qiskit
    Title: Qiskit Workshop Location: BA1130 Abstract: Come join the Qiskit hands-on workshop to learn the fundamentals of programming a quantum computer. Learn how to create quantum circuits visually using Circuit Composer IBM Quantum platform, and programmatically, using open source Qiskit framework. Run your circuits on quantum simulators and real quantum computer. To get the best experience out of the workshop, sign-up for a free account on IBM Quantum platform beforehand at https://quantum-computing.ibm.com/. About the Speaker: Hemavathi Santhanam is an IBM Quantum Ambassador and a Qiskit Advocate. As for her day job, Hema is a Delivery Consultant at IBM Expert Labs building enterprise solutions around Data Governance and AI with IBM Cloud Pak for Data. She is a graduate in Computing and Data Analytics from Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
  • 4:10 PM | Brianna Lee - Creative Destruction Lab
    Title: Destruction Lab - Building Quantum Startups Location: BA1130 Abstract: CDL is an objective-based mentorship program for science- and technology- based startups. The CDL Quantum program has supported about 1/5 of all quantum startups worldwide through a technical and business training bootcamp and mentorship from leading Quantum operators, investors and scientists. Companies including Xanadu, OTI Lumionics and Multiverse Computing have come through the CDL Quantum Program at their earliest stage of development. They have since grown to raise large rounds and be integral parts to the Quantum ecosystem. About the Speaker: Brianna is a Venture Manager and Recruitment Lead at the Creative Destruction Lab’s Quantum Stream. Prior to joining the Quantum team, she led CDL-Seattle recruitment of its first cohort of computational health companies. She has a Bachelor of Commerce from the University of Toronto under the Management Specialist with a double focus in Finance and Strategy & Innovation.
  • 10:50 AM | Amir Karamlou - Google Quantum
    Title: Quantum simulation of many-body systems with superconducting qubits. Location: BA1130 Abstract: Many-body quantum systems exhibit rich fundamental physics, however, they are often difficult to study analytically, and computationally intractable to simulate using a classical computer. Superconducting quantum circuits have emerged as promising and well-controlled quantum hardware capable of simulating many-body quantum systems. In this talk I will discuss the basics of superconducting qubits, and using a superconducting quantum processor for quantum simulation. In addition, I will present our results utilizing superconducting qubits to study the nature of the entanglement formed in many-body quantum systems. We generate different quantum states in a 4x4 qubit array and observe a crossover from area-law entanglement scaling for states near the edges of the energy spectrum of the system to volume-law scaling at its center. About the Speaker: Amir received his PhD from MIT in 2023 where his research focused on experimental quantum computation using superconducting qubits, and in particular quantum simulation. Prior to pursuing a PhD Amir graduated from MIT with a B.S. in Physics and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and an M.Eng in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in. Outside of the lab he is involved with various teaching initiatives such as the Qubit by Qubit program as the lead instructor of the year-long introductory quantum computing program aimed towards high school students.
  • 4:50 PM | Quantum Life Panel
    Unlock the intricacies of life in the field of quantum technology with our seasoned speakers at our very own Quantum Life panel discussion! Location: BA1160 Moderator: Anna Dyring About the Moderator: Anna Dyring is the Quantum Strategic Initiative Lead at the Centre for Quantum Information and Quantum Control (CQQIQC), UofT’s quantum centre with more than 30 research groups working both theoretically and experimentally on a range of quantum topics. Anna’s previous roles include project/product manager in several aerospace, technical consulting and biotechnology companies, where she led complex product development and delivery projects. She holds an MSc in Engineering Physics from Uppsala University, Sweden and a PhD in High Energy (Particle) Physics from Uppsala University and CERN. Anna has a broad interest in science, technology and the arts, and enjoys working at the intersection of academia, industry and the public sphere. Speaker: Brianna Lee About the Speaker: Brianna is a Venture Manager and Recruitment Lead at the Creative Destruction Lab’s Quantum Stream. Prior to joining the Quantum team, she led CDL-Seattle recruitment of its first cohort of computational health companies. She has a Bachelor of Commerce from the University of Toronto under the Management Specialist with a double focus in Finance and Strategy & Innovation. Speaker: Michał Stęchły About the Speaker: Michał is a Quantum Software Engineer at PsiQuantum, and before that at Zapata Computing. He has been developing software for both NISQ and fault-tolerant quantum computers for the last 5 years. Michał is an active member of the QC community, helping to grow the quantum open-source ecosystem, organizing events and mentoring people. He also has a blog: www.mustythoughts.com where he writes about QC-related topics. Speaker: Daniel Felipe Nino About the Speaker: Daniel is currently a Quantum Computing Educator at Xanadu, where he helps educators around the world train the next generation of talent in quantum computing and incorporate PennyLane into university curricula. He holds a MSc. in Physics from the University of Toronto, with a research focus on ultracold atomic physics. He also holds a PhD from the University of Toronto specializing in single-molecule biophysics. After a brief postdoc, Daniel taught in various departments within the University of Toronto and was the lead instructor for the INSPIRE Scholars Program hosted at the University of Toronto Mississauga. Speaker: Michael Grabowecky About the Speaker: Michael is the lab coordinator for the Master’s in Quantum Technologies program offered at the University of Waterloo. He obtained his master’s degree from the University of Waterloo’s Institute for Quantum Computing in experimental quantum optics with applications to quantum foundations. Currently, Michael ensures the effective teaching of the experimental component of the Quantum Technologies program. His role includes managing a dedicated laboratory used to deliver the three core hands-on courses offered in the program. Additionally, Michael assists with, and prepares demonstrations for many IQC and TQT outreach events such as the Undergraduate School for Experimental Quantum Information Processing (USEQIP), and the Quantum School for Young Scientists (QSYS), which are yearly summer schools aimed at getting undergraduate and high school students hands-on experience with quantum technologies and sparking interest in quantum STEM fields. Speaker: Aharon Brodutch About the Speaker: Aharon Brodutch leads the Architecture team at IonQ. He joined IonQ following their acquisition of Entangled Networks, a Toronto based startup developing solutions for multi-core quantum computing. Prior to founding Entangled Networks with Ilia Khait in 2020, Aharon held a CQIQC post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Toronto and an IQC post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Waterloo's Institute for Quantum Computing in Waterloo. Aharon Obtained his Phd in theoretical physics and quantum information from Macquarie University, Sydney and his M.Sc and B.Sc from Tel Aviv University.
  • 2:45 PM | Ara Ghukasyan - Agnostiq
    Title: Time Series Anomaly Detection with Quantum Variational Rewinding Location: BA1130 Abstract: A variety of important problems in healthcare, finance, and technology rely on detecting strange, potentially dangerous, sequences of events among normal everyday occurrences. Formally, this is precisely the notion of time series anomaly detection (TAD). Rather than flagging individual events that deviate from the norm – a less difficult problem – a more salient goal here is to identify several events that represent anomalous behaviour when considered in context. In this talk, we present a highly scalable quantum machine learning algorithm for TAD with freely available NISQ hardware. This algorithm, which we refer to as Quantum Variational Rewinding (QVR), relies on training a family of parameterized unitary time-devolution operators to cluster normal time series instances that are encoded within quantum states. In other words, we train a quantum model to “rewind” series-encoding states to initial states which are similar for normal time series, but differ for abnormal ones. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the efficacy of this algorithm on the real-world problem of identifying anomalous transactions in cryptocurrency market data. About the Speaker: Ara Ghukasyan is a Research Software Engineer at Agnostiq Inc. (agnostiq.ai). He holds an undergraduate degree in Mathematics & Physics and a Ph.D. in Engineering Physics from McMaster University. Before working in quantum computing, he researched semiconductor hardware and atomistic simulations of nanoscale heat transport. Ara’s casual interests include music, film, and broad topics in science and computation. Ara also enjoys an avid interest in electric guitar and bass.
  • 3:25 PM | Clarice Aiello - University of California, Los Angeles
    Title: “Quantum Biology”: how nature harnesses quantum processes to function optimally, and how might we control such quantum processes to therapeutic advantage. Location: BA1130 Abstract: Imagine driving cell activities to treat injuries and disease simply by using tailored magnetic fields. Many relevant physiological processes, such as: the regulation of reactive oxygen species; epigenetic changes to induce pluripotency; cell proliferation and wound healing; cellular respiration rates; ion channel functioning; and DNA repair were all demonstrated to be controlled by weak magnetic fields (with a strength on the order of that produced by your cell phone), very likely via the electron quantum property of “spin”. Research has not been able to track spin states to manipulate physiological outcomes in vivo and in real time, without which the potential game-changing clinical benefits of “Quantum Biology” cannot be realized. With novel quantum instrumentation, we are learning to control spin states in cells and tissues, having as a goal to write the “codebook” on how to deterministically alter physiology with weak magnetic fields to therapeutic advantage. In the long-term, the electromagnetic fine-tuning of endogenous “quantum knobs” existing in nature will enable the development of drugs and therapeutic devices that could heal the human body — in a way that is non-invasive, remotely actuated, and easily accessible by anyone with a mobile phone. About the Speaker: Prof. Clarice D. Aiello is a quantum engineer interested in how quantum physics informs biology at the nanoscale. She is an expert on nanosensors harnessing room-temperature quantum effects in noisy environments. Aiello received her B.S. in Physics from the Ecole Polytechnique; her M.Phil. in Physics from the University of Cambridge, Trinity College; and her Ph.D. from MIT in Electrical Engineering. She also held postdoctoral appointments in Bioengineering at Stanford, and in Chemistry at Berkeley. Two months before the pandemic, she joined UCLA, where she leads the Quantum Biology Tech (QuBiT) Lab.
  • 4:30 PM | Michal Stechly - PsiQuantum
    Title: Navigating the jungle of quantum open-source. Location: BA1130 Abstract: In this talk, I'd like to explain how to navigate the jungle of open-source quantum computing projects. I'll go over different types of projects that exist out there and why I think contributing to OS projects is a great way to grow your skills and contribute to the community. About the Speaker: Michał is a Quantum Software Engineer at PsiQuantum, and before that at Zapata Computing. He has been developing software for both NISQ and fault-tolerant quantum computers for the last 5 years. Michał is an active member of the QC community, helping to grow the quantum open-source ecosystem, organizing events and mentoring people. He also has a blog: www.mustythoughts.com where he writes about QC-related topics.
  • 11:55 PM | Student Talks [Part 2]
    Location: BA024 Student: Roeland Wiersema Title: Classification of Dynamical Lie Algebras for Translation-Invariant 2-Local Spin Systems in One Dimension. Abstract: Much is understood about one dimensional spin chains in terms of entanglement properties, physical phases, and integrability. However, the Lie algebraic properties of the Hamiltonians describing these systems remain largely unexplored. In this talk, I will present a classification of all Lie algebras generated by translation-invariant 2-local spin chain Hamiltonians, or so-called dynamical Lie algebras. I will discuss chains with open and periodic boundary conditions and show that there exist 17 unique dynamical Lie algebras. The classification covers some well-known models such as the transverse-field Ising model and the Heisenberg chain, but we also find more exotic classes of Hamiltonians that cannot be identified easily. I will discuss the practical implications of this work in the context of quantum control, variational quantum computing, and the spin chain literature. Location: BA025 Student: Luis Mantilla Calderon Title: Measurement-based Quantum Machine Learning. Abstract: A quantum neural network (QNN) is an object that extends the notion of a classical neural network to quantum models for quantum data. We can create a QNN by parametrizing a quantum process and then using it to model unknown relations between quantum states. In this talk, we explore how to use measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) for quantum machine learning (QML) problems and propose a universal QNN in this framework which we call the multiple-triangle ansatz (MuTA). Using the proposed QNN, we solve several tasks, including learning a universal set of gates, a POVM with post-processing, a quantum instrument, and the classification of classical data. Finally, we discuss how to train an ansatz under the hardware constraints imposed by photonic Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill (GKP) qubits.
  • 5:30 PM | Award Ceremony
    Get ready to applaud innovation and excellence at the Q-SITE Awards Ceremony! Join us as we celebrate and honour our participants. It's a night of celebration you won't want to miss. Location: BA1160
  • 1:15 PM | Anne Broadbent - University of Ottawa
    Title: Quantum Unclonability and Cryptography Location: BA1130 Abstract: According to the unclonability property of quantum information, it is not possible, in general, to duplicate an unknown quantum state. Quantum cryptography is the science of communication and computation in the presence of an adversary. Because quantum adversaries are also bound by the unclonability property, this creates a myriad of opportunities for quantum cryptographers. We will discuss how unclonability permeates quantum cryptography: from the early findings on quantum money and quantum key distribution, to recent work on unclonable quantum encryption, certified deletion, and unclonable software. About the Speaker: Prof. Broadbent is a Full Professor at the University of Ottawa, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, with cross appointments to the Department of Physics and to the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Prof. Broadbent holds the University or Ottawa Research Chair in Quantum Information and Cryptography. Her research relates to cryptography, communication, and information processing in a quantum world. Prof. Broadbent’s research is recognized by multiple awards and accolades, including the University of Ottawa Young Researcher of the Year Award (2019), the Ontario Early Researcher Award (2016), the André Aisenstadt Prize in Mathematics (2016), the John Charles Polanyi Prize (2010) and the NSERC Doctoral Prize (2009).
  • 12:10 PM | Student Talks [Part 3]
    Location: BA025 Student: Danial Motlagh Title: Generalized Quantum Signal Processing. Abstract: Quantum Signal Processing (QSP) and Quantum Singular Value Transformation (QSVT) currently stand as the most efficient techniques for implementing functions of block encoded matrices, a central task that lies at the heart of most prominent quantum algorithms. However, current QSP approaches face several challenges, such as the restrictions imposed on the family of achievable polynomials and the difficulty of calculating the required phase angles for specific transformations. In this paper, we present a Generalized Quantum Signal Processing (GQSP) approach, employing general SU(2) rotations as our signal processing operators, rather than relying solely on rotations in a single basis. Our approach lifts all practical restrictions on the family of achievable transformations, with the sole remaining condition being that $|P|\leq 1$, a restriction necessary due to the unitary nature of quantum computation. Furthermore, GQSP provides a straightforward recursive formula for determining the rotation angles needed to construct the polynomials in cases where $P$ and $Q$ are known. In cases where only $P$ is known, we provide an efficient optimization algorithm capable of identifying in under a minute of GPU time, a corresponding $Q$ for polynomials of degree on the order of $10^7$. We further illustrate GQSP simplifies QSP-based strategies for Hamiltonian simulation, offer an optimal solution to the $\epsilon$-approximate fractional query problem that requires $\mathcal{O}\left(\frac{1}{\delta} + \log(\large\frac{1}{\epsilon})\right)$ queries to perform where $\mathcal{O}(1/\delta)$ is a proved lower bound, and introduces novel approaches for implementing bosonic operators. Moreover, we propose a novel framework for the implementation of normal matrices, demonstrating its applicability through synthesis of diagonal matrices, as well as the development of a new algorithm for convolution through synthesis of circulant matrices using only $\mathcal{O}(d \log{N} + \log^2N)$ 1 and 2-qubit gates for a filter of lengths $d$.
  • 3:05 PM | Jane Dong - IBM Quantum
    Title: Getting Started with Quantum Computing Location: BA1130 Abstract: Curious about IBM's Quantum ecosystem and development roadmap? Come learn more about the IBM Quantum Network, Qiskit community and exciting offerings that can empower you with the knowledge and resources you need to begin your quantum computing journey. About the Speaker: Jane Dong is an IBM Quantum Ambassador and Digital Enablement Leader for Hybrid Cloud Services. Jane graduated from the University of Toronto specializing in Physics and Mathematics with high distinction. She has solutioned and delivered enterprise level digital solutions for clients across North America. Outside of her Quantum Ambassador role, Jane and her team focus on creating digital, emerging tech and hybrid cloud solutions consulting works the following streams: Solution Envisioning, Proof-of-concept Development, Production Ready Pilot development services for clients in Energy Utilities, Retail, Engineering & Construction, FSS and Public Sectors.
  • 9:00 AM | Registration and Snacks
    Indulge in some snacks as we commence the final day of Q-SITE! Location: Bahen Centre for Information Technology
  • 10:00 AM | Gaurav Saxena - LG Electronics Toronto AI Lab
    Title: Introduction to magic states: the resource to achieve universal fault tolerant quantum computation. Location: BA1130 Abstract: Fault-tolerant quantum computation can be achieved using the stabilizer formalism. However, stabilizer circuits can not perform universal quantum computation. Morevover, it has been shown that quantum circuits made out of stabilizer operations with stabilizer states as inputs can be efficiently simulated on a classical computer. Hence, stabilizer circuits do not provide any quantum computational advantage. To achieve universal quantum computations, magic states need to be injected in stabilizer circuits. In this talk, I will first first talk about stabilizer state and stabilizer operations, and then will discuss about magic states, their quantification, and interconversion. In the end, I will briefly talk about recent classical simulation algorithms of quantum circuits with magic states as inputs and how the runtime of such algorithms scale with different magic states. About the Speaker: Gaurav is a quantum research scientist at LG AI Toronto Lab and is currently working on quantum algorithms and error mitigation. Gaurav obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Calgary where he worked on quantum information, specifically, dynamical quantum resource theories. In his Ph.D., he has developed dynamical resource theories of coherence and magic. His research interests encompass a wide range of topics in quantum information and computing. He loves to talk about quantum and can easily be reached out to via LinkedIn.
  • 9:40 AM | Michael Grabowecky - Institute for Quantum Computing
    Title: IQC: Introducing a hands-on graduate degree in quantum technologies. Location: BA1130 Abstract: The Master of Science in Quantum Technology program is a novel, one-year, coursed-based degree aimed at providing students with a robust experimental skillset through hands-on experience using state-of-the-art equipment relevant to the forefront of modern quantum technology research. This program is offered in partnership with the Department of Physics and Astronomy, the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC), and the Transformative Quantum Technologies research initiative (TQT) at the University of Waterloo. The program features three dedicated courses in experimental quantum information science. Through these courses, students explore spin dynamics and coherent control systems, quantum optical systems, and superconducting electronic devices. Students are offered the opportunity of engaging in a one semester work term with a supervisor of their choosing, enabling access to research experience in state-of-the-art laboratories. This program aims to prepare students to enter the ever-growing quantum industry, and for transitioning into high-impact Ph.D. positions focused on experimental quantum information processing. About the Speaker: Michael is the lab coordinator for the Master’s in Quantum Technologies program offered at the University of Waterloo. He obtained his master’s degree from the University of Waterloo’s Institute for Quantum Computing in experimental quantum optics with applications to quantum foundations. Currently, Michael ensures the effective teaching of the experimental component of the Quantum Technologies program. His role includes managing a dedicated laboratory used to deliver the three core hands-on courses offered in the program. Additionally, Michael assists with, and prepares demonstrations for many IQC and TQT outreach events such as the Undergraduate School for Experimental Quantum Information Processing (USEQIP), and the Quantum School for Young Scientists (QSYS), which are yearly summer schools aimed at getting undergraduate and high school students hands-on experience with quantum technologies and sparking interest in quantum STEM fields.
  • 2:05 PM | Erik Garcell - Classiq [Lightning Talk]
    Title: Classiq and the Future of Quantum Computing Location: BA1130 About the Speaker: Dr. Erik Garcell is technical marketing manager at Classiq, which is revolutionizing the process of developing quantum computing software by taking quantum software to a higher level. Dr. Garcell was previously innovation product manager for IP.com and an innovation research scientist at Kodak Alaris. He has a doctorate in physics from the University of Rochester and a Master of Science in Technical Entrepreneurship & Management from the University of Rochester’s Simon School of Business.
  • 11:40 AM | Student Talks [Part 1]
    Location: BA024 Student: Andrei Olar Title: Atomistic Simulation of 3nm FinFET properties for use in Spin-Based Quantum Computers. Abstract: Quantum computers have the potential to reshape how science is done in the future, allowing physicists, biologists, and chemists, among others, the opportunity to better simulate the real-world phenomena they are interested in. This is in large part due to the fact that quantum computers are inherently intertwined with quantum effects, and as such provide an unparalleled tool for understanding the strange world of quantum. This is all not to say that we are on the cusp of reaching these truths, rather there is a lot of work still left to be done. Spin-Based Quantum computers could prove to be scalable, efficient, and viable for use in a range of applications, but currently face some roadblocks. Modern FinFET and FDSOI technologies that are suitable for high-density quantum processor applications have constraints that limit the types of quantum dot arrays and gates that can be implemented. A quantum dot is an electron trapped in a potential well and QDs can serve as qubits. Since these transistor technologies serve as potential traps for the electrons, they are paramount for viable Quantum Computers. 3nm FinFET technology would not have these same constraints, and as such could be a viable path forward for scaling, as they allow better QD entangled gates, though higher temperature behavior and explanations for measured characteristics are not currently available. This is what my research focuses on, as I plan to simulate scaled versions of these FinFETs in order to gauge their behavior and help inform manufacturer choices in the future. Though only one FinFET simulation is currently available, more designs will be iterated on. Location: BA025 Student: Nishaant Jacobus Title: Controlling Non-Equilibrium Steady States via Environmental Tuning. Abstract: While isolated quantum systems undergo unitary evolution as described by the Schrödinger Equation, these dynamics are significantly altered when these systems interact with their environment. Elucidating the behavior of these open quantum systems has many applications, including the realization of quantum computing and understanding the role of quantum mechanics in biological processes such as light harvesting and vision. In particular, environmental influences allow these systems to attain non-equilibrium steady states (NESS) that show strong dependencies on the properties of the closed system. For instance, we have shown computationally that the quantum yield of the photoisomerization of rhodopsin, the first step of vision, has a sensitive dependence on closed system parameters such as the electronic energy gap. Further studies on a broader family of models such as the Rabi Model showed that this sensitivity is a general property of open systems, with spikes in flux rates correlated with low-energy avoided crossings. Given this strong dependence of the NESS on the properties of the system, a natural follow-up question is whether the NESS exhibits a similar dependence on the environment; namely, for a fixed system, can we control the steady state by tuning the system-environment coupling? To investigate this question, we numerically examine the steady state properties of exciton transport in the Holstein Model, a chain of sites coupled to local harmonic modes that could represent scenarios such as energy transport in polymers. We find that the steady-state exciton populations can be controlled by tuning the dissipation strength of the environment, and we note an interesting parallel between this steady state behavior and the transient dynamics of the system. These results suggest that it may be possible to optimize the performance of a quantum system by engineering the environment appropriately.
  • 2:25 PM | Anna Dyring - CQIQC, University of Toronto
    Title: Quantum Careers Location: BA1130 Abstract: I will talk broadly about quantum career paths and how CQIQC supports students through a range of learning and research opportunities in quantum science and technology. I will also share some observations and advice that may help anyone interested in exploring a career in the exciting and growing quantum sector. My goal is to inform, inspire, and challenge. About the Speaker: Anna Dyring is the Quantum Strategic Initiative Lead at the Centre for Quantum Information and Quantum Control (CQQIQC), UofT’s quantum centre with more than 30 research groups working both theoretically and experimentally on a range of quantum topics. Anna’s previous roles include project/product manager in several aerospace, technical consulting and biotechnology companies, where she led complex product development and delivery projects. She holds an MSc in Engineering Physics from Uppsala University, Sweden and a PhD in High Energy (Particle) Physics from Uppsala University and CERN. Anna has a broad interest in science, technology and the arts, and enjoys working at the intersection of academia, industry and the public sphere.
  • How will the mini-challenges work?
    All attendees will be given access to the conference Discord server. On Friday and Saturday, in-person attendees will be given the opportunity to network with each other and find their mini-challenges team of size 2-4. Online attendees will do so via networking channels on the Discord server. Before the challenges are released, all teams must register via a Google Form (one submission per team). GitHub instructions on how to access challenges and submit responses will be provided. Upon submitting on Saturday night, winners and awards will be declared during the Sunday closing ceremony.
  • Do I need to be an expert or have existing knowledge in quantum to attend this conference?
    Absolutely not. The Q-SITE program is specifically designed to jump start attendees’ quantum curiosity and careers – from the ground up. The first talk will be an introductory talk on the basics of quantum computing and relevant technologies. We hope for this talk to catch everyone up to speed with the foundational concepts needed to engage in the rest of the conference.
  • What is the Entanglement project?
    After answering a series of questions during registration, our “Entanglement” ML model will place each attendees on a “map of technical interests”. We aim for this networking tool to allow attendees to connect with like-minded fellows as well as reach out to specific people with specific interests.
  • Who is Q-SITE 2023 for?
    Q-SITE 2023 is a conference created by students, for students. Specifically, we aim to address undergraduates and early graduates who are either (1) new to the field of quantum technologies or (2) interested in pursuing an aspect of the field different from their profession. As a result of this conference, attendees will get the opportunity to become aware of the breadth of interdisciplinary fields quantum technologies have to offer. We hope this allows them enough time to confidently choose a path or subfield that they want to pursue further.
  • What are the student poster and student talk sessions?
    The student poster and talk sessions give a chance for undergraduate and graduate students to present their quantum research work in a conference setting. Not only do we aim to exercise student presentation skills but more importantly, showcase student contributions and endeavours in quantum information science and technologies.
  • What are the differences between the in-person and online experiences?
    Both experiences will be able to engage (and win prizes) in the mini-challenges (mini-hackathon) provided by key sponsor companies and view golden hour talks streamed between the two conference locations. However, only in-person attendees will be able to engage in the UofT quantum research lab tours and networking dinner provided on Friday evening, student poster session and graduate fair on Saturday afternoon, and student talks on Sunday morning. The conference lasts for a half-day on Friday and full-day on Saturday and Sunday; online attendees will be streamed only the full-day Saturday and Sunday talks.
  • Mojtaba (Moji) Khavaninzadeh @ UofT
    Moji is passionate about quantum information and much interested in quantum hardware architectures to build quantum computers. He is in his 5th year at UofT, specializing in Physics and minoring in Economics.
  • Vivek Dhande @UofT
    My name is Vivek, an Engineering Science student specializing in Engineering Physics. I am currently on my PEY at Xanadu and also doing research in semiconductor quantum dots for spin-qubit quantum computing. Other than learning about all the different quantum hardware architectures, I love trail running and hiking, especially in the Canadian Rockies.
  • Director: Mayank Shenoy @ UofT
    Hello there. I'm Mayank Shenoy and I am in the fourth and final year of my astrophysics undergraduate degree. My research interest primarily lies in late stages of massive stellar evolution and death along with the quantum mechanical implications on high energy physics. I hope to dabble in the latter during this year and my future endeavours. If you see a big guy who looks like he has made his long hair his whole personality, come say hii and chat about sneakers, lifting, cooking or even research (since it is a conference XD).
  • Web Developer: Elizabeth Tyra Sumual @ UofT
    Hey, I’m Tyra! I’m an incoming third-year Electrical and Computer Engineering student. As I prefer hardware more than software, I want to learn more about quantum hardware and the intricacies inherent in constructing such technology. Outside of engineering, I like to cook different cuisines of food, read self-help books, play badminton, and go to concerts.
  • Web Developer: Krishna Advait Sripada @ UofT
    Greetings! I'm Krishna, a 3rd-year Computer Engineering student with dual minors in AI and Business. I'm deeply passionate about all things software and AI. Exploring Quantum machine learning and supercomputers intrigues me, as I believe they hold the power to reshape our world. Beyond the tech realm, I'm a speedcuber (did you know I solve a 3x3 Rubik’s cube in 10 seconds?), and I enjoy engaging in sports like cricket, soccer, badminton, table tennis, swimming, dodgeball, pool, and foosball.
  • Director: Emily Su @ UofT
    Hey! Emily here. I’m in my third year of undergrad studying statistics, computer science, and computational cognitive science. I’m interested in quantum algorithms and their application, as well as designing & developing aesthetically pleasing products (graphics, websites, etc.). In my free time, I enjoy taking dance and gymnastics classes, listening to music (specifically old pop, Kpop, and Jpop), and playing story-driven/tactical RPG games.
  • Web Developer: Vivian Song @ UofT
    I’m a second-year student pursuing a specialist in computer science at the University of Toronto. As an aspiring software engineer, I'm interested in the vast potential in computing efficiency offered by quantum computers as opposed to existing supercomputers. In my free time, I enjoy playing the guitar, skating, watching K-dramas, and going restaurant-hunting in downtown Toronto!
  • Associate: Michael Silver @ UofT
    Hi, everyone. My name is Michael. I’m entering my second year of Electrical Engineering. I am interested in superconducting QC and quantum machine learning. I like to play basketball, skateboard in downtown Toronto, and listen to RnB in my free time.
  • Associate: Amber King @ UofT
  • Director: Amelie Zhang @ UofT
    Hi everyone! I am a fourth year undergrad in math specialist and physics specialist program, along with a minor in computer science at the University of Toronto. My current research interest lies between experimental and theoretical physics in the field of quantum optics. Recently, I have been building a brand new atomic clock with my research group which will potentially define our new definition of a second in time. I am curious about the world in all aspects. Beyond academia, I love playing the piano (especially at Hart House), gyming, golfing, playing chess, reading sci-fi novels, going to rec room, and exploring different restaurants with my friends.
  • Associate: Adam Radek Martinez @ UofT
    I am a fourth-year engineering science student specializing in Physics. As an engineer, I am fundamentally interested in getting a robust, scalable quantum processing platform to work - right now, my intuition says that solid-state spin systems may be the best candidate. Outside of Physics, I enjoy running and exploring Japanese Ramen shops in Toronto with friends.
  • Director: Arkaprava Choudhury @ UofT
    I am a fourth-year computer science and maths specialist focusing on the theory of computation. I’m interested in quantum algorithms for Hamiltonian simulation, complexity theory (especially time- and query-complexity and probabilistic classes), and online algorithms. I love cycling, shogi, and underground manga and am interested in computational cognition and linguistics. I also like chatting about good Indian restaurants in Toronto.
  • Associate: Aditya Chugh @UofT
    I’m a third-year undergraduate student in the Mathematics and Physics Specialist Program at UofT. I’m interested in all things quantum, and I also love engaging in outreach/exposition from time to time (which is what brought me to this amazing conference!). I’ve previously worked in balloon astrophysics and dark matter phenomenology. When not doing physics (or thinking of doing physics), I like to go on runs, play soccer, or make jokes which are sometimes funny.
  • Associate: Chaitanya Kumar Mahajan @ UofT
    Heyo! I’m in my third year studying physics and computer science. I’m interested in experimental particle physics and the hardware of quantum computers. Over the summer, I worked with a tiny portion of the ATLAS ITk upgrade. In my free time, I’m either walking to Harbor Front or already there and reading some fantasy novel.
  • Associate: Sophia Bonellos @ UofT
  • Director: Umi Yamaguchi @UofT
    Hey guys, my name is Umi. I’ll be a second-year at UofT majoring in Physics and Statistics, interested in quantum software and finance applications. I enjoy training, baking, watching anime, and learning new things in my spare time! I hope you will enjoy our conference :D
  • Associate: Youssef Rachad @ UofT
    Hi, I’m a 3rd year engineering physics major who enjoys quantum computing, deep learning and numerical methods. I also write on the QNews team and explore the latest discoveries in quantum computing (currently, I’m learning about superconducting and neutral atom devices). Outside of numbers, I enjoy running, biking and playing chess. See you all at Q-SITE!
  • Director: Margaret Guo @ UofT
    Hello! My name is Margaret and I’m going into my 3rd year of Engineering Physics. This summer, I delved into quantum interferometry, dabbled in various quantum computing applications and explored the intersection of astrophysics and machine learning! Attending QSITE 2022 allowed me to discover my interest in quantum computing and technology so I am incredibly excited to be a part of QSITE this year! Outside of quantum, I love hiking, biking, fountain pens and collecting souvenir shot glasses from my travels. Here’s to a great conference!
  • Associate: Samantha Corapi @ UofT
    Hi, I’m Sam! I am entering my first year of an MSc in Chemistry. I am interested in researching machine learning applications to chemistry. During my free time, I enjoy going on long walks, listening to music, trying new restaurants in Toronto, and attending quantum computing conferences!!! :)
  • Director: Shaswata Chowdhury @UofT
    Hello - I’m Shaswata, and I’m a third-year Physics and Computer Science student with a focus on machine learning. I’m interested in superconducting quantum computing and condensed matter physics, so feel free to reach out if you’re interested in those! I like reading fiction, playing RPGs and playing badminton. Let’s chat at Q-SITE!
  • Associate: Radhika Banerjea @ UofT
    Hello! I am a second-year Engineering Science student. I’m interested in learning more about Quantum Machine Learning and its applications. When I’m not rewatching shows on Netflix, I like to swim, read, listen to music, and paint.
  • Associate: Yvonne Zhang @ UofT
    Hi, everyone! I’m in my PEY co-op year for Mechanical Engineering, minoring in Robotics & Mechatronics. When I’m not spending all my money on concerts and Broadway, I love taking my cat on walks and bike rides.
  • Director: Maggie Li @ UofT
    Hey, I’m Maggie! I’m a third-year Engineering Science student specializing in Biomedical Systems Engineering. I’m interested in regenerative medicine, biophysics (especially crossovers of quantum mechanics in biology), and longevity/aging biology. Some other things I like include matcha, memoirs, art, design, dogs, hiking, cooking, trying different cuisines of food, and sci-fi. Say hi! :)
  • Associate: Stephanie Cui @ UofT
    Hi, everyone! I’m a second-year student studying Physics and Philosophy, and quantum mechanics is an exemplar of the nexus between these two fields. I’m thrilled to delve more into this fascinating topic in my upcoming courses as well as at the Q-SITE conference! I’m also very passionate about literature, so I read and write a lot during my free time.
  • Associate: Parth Mahendru @ UofT
    Third-year engineering science student with a background in Aerospace Coating Technologies, Control Systems, Quantum Physics, Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence, and Computer Vision. Deeply interested in the intersection of engineering processes, quantum phenomena, and AI-driven experimentations. Passionate about leveraging these insights to develop novel methods that accelerate scientific progress.
  • Associate: Kamal Mohamed Ali @ Memorial University of Newfoundland
    As a recent graduate with a Bachelor’s in Computer Engineering, I am passionate about developing software that makes a positive impact. I am also big on hackathons which led me to start my university’s first hackathon, and I have since worked with many student communities. Hoping to break into quantum computing one day!
  • Director: Haneen Sakaji @ Toronto Metropolitan University
    Welcome! My name is Haneen, and I am a second-year Medical Physics major. I am highly intrigued by the applications of quantum sensors to the field of medical physics, such as quantum brain sensors and improved radiation therapy. My hobbies include robotics, art and biking.
  • Chair: Sherwin Tiu
    Affiliation: The University of British Columbia (UBC) I am a third year Electrical Engineering student interested in technologies that could make a better world. I also work with the UBC Quantum Club to promote quantum computing to further awareness of the technology to undergraduates in Metro Vancouver.
  • Associate: Ehsan Nadeem
    Affiliation: Simon Fraser University (SFU) Chemical Physics Undergraduate at SFU, with an interest in Nuclear Chemistry Research.
  • Director: Lily Watt
    Affiliation: The University of British Columbia (UBC) Hi Q-SITE! I'm Lily, an Engineering Physics student at UBC, and the Q-SITE Logistics director. I am also part of the team at the UBC Quantum Club, making Quantum Computing accessible to undergraduates of all skill levels. Happy to chat at in/lily-watt
  • Associate: Shahzad Shams
    Affiliation: The University of British Columbia (UBC) Second year biomedical engineering at UBC interested in the intersection between quantum computing and biomedical applications.
  • Associate: Omid Bodaghi
    Affiliation: University of Calgary I am a Master's student and work on post-quantum cryptography.
  • Associate: Hrishikesh Patel
    Affiliation: The University of British Columbia (UBC) I am Hrishi and I'm pursuing MSc. Physics @ UBC! My research interests lie on the interface of QI and CMT. Whenever I'm not doing Physics/Math, you can find me running, hiking or reading!
  • Director: Revika Jain
    Affiliation: The University of British Columbia (UBC) Hello, I am a 4th year computer Science student at Simon Fraser University! I Have a keen interest in quantum computing and I have been able to grow my skills during my co-op term at D-wave systems. Looking forward to meeting everyone!
  • Director: Malcolm Pidsosny
    Affiliation: Simon Fraser University (SFU) Hi! My name is Malcolm. I am currently in my last semester of my BSc majoring in Physics at SFU. My research focus is in stellar astrophysics, however I also love quantum mechanics and the concept of connecting relativity and quantum through quantum gravity.
  • Associate: Neil Jadav
    Affiliation: The University of British Columbia (UBC) Neil is a 3rd year student at UBC pursuing an honours in physics and astronomy in the faculty of science, with the hope of pursuing academia and research opportunities.
  • Associate: Jenny Zhu
    Affiliation: The University of British Columbia (UBC)
  • Director: Valentina Mazzotti
    Affiliation: The University of British Columbia (UBC) Valentina is currently in her fourth year of an undergraduate degree in physics and computer science at UBC. Her primary focus is on computational condensed matter physics to guide the discovery and prediction of new material properties.
  • Director: Esther Kim
    Affiliation: The University of British Columbia (UBC) Hey guys, my name is Esther and I am a rising third year at UBC, currently in the combined major of chemistry and biology and researching at UBC under the field of neuroscience. I enjoy going on long walks and listening to R&B.
  • UPDATED | 6:15 - 6:55 PM | Talk by Elizabeth Kleisath
    Title: Sharing your science passion: communicating quantum without hype Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: “Quantum” is frequently used as a buzzword favoured by advertisers and marketers, aimed to appeal to consumers for its science-forward and mysterious allure. Yet, all too often, these “quantum-powered” products have nothing to do with actual quantum science or technology. The broad misrepresentation of quantum in today’s pop culture shouldn’t prevent us from sharing quantum stories and discoveries in ways that are grounded in scientific reality. Clearly communicating quantum research and its real-world impacts is an important skill. It’s key to securing recognition and funding, inspiring new generations of quantum scientists, and engaging and educating the genuinely curious public. This talk will provide you with tools and confidence to share your passion and interest in quantum information science and technology, and find the right communication style for you to meaningfully connect with a variety of audiences. About the speaker: Elizabeth Kleisath is the Communications Officer at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC), a research institute at the University of Waterloo. Elizabeth holds master's degrees in materials chemistry and science communications. She is passionate about sharing her curiosity about the world around us and has a talent for explaining complicated science topics in approachable ways. At IQC, Elizabeth is responsible for sharing quantum stories about the research and breakthroughs happening at the institute.
  • 5:55 - 6.10 PM | Talk by Bahiyyih Peters
    Title: The Quantum BC Community Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: The Quantum BC Community includes students, faculty and industry involved in quantum computing in British Columbia (and beyond). Find out about the many exciting activities and opportunities including seminars, workshops, courses, mentorships, scholarships and more. There will also be a virtual Quantum BC Open House on November 8 with lots of information and a chance to ask questions. Find out more at www.quantum-bc.ca About the speaker: Bahiyyih Peters Bahiyyih Peters is the Program Coordinator of the NSERC CREATE in Quantum Computing Program. With a background in Sociology and Music, Bahiyyih has years of work and volunteer experience organizing events and building community. She is passionate about student engagement and providing opportunities for marginalized groups in STEAM.
  • 2:30 - 3:30 PM | Registration and Snacks
    Location: Kaiser Concourse (KAIS 2020/2030) Fred Kaiser Building 2332 Main Mall Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z4, Canada Get Directions
  • 4.30 - 5.15 PM | Talk by Barry Sanders
    Title: Quantum kittens, cats, combs and compasses: superposing coherent states for sensing, communication, computing and pleasure Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: Superpositions of coherent states, which have minimum uncertainty and follow, at least transiently, classical motion, constitute codes for quantum computing, enhance quantum communication and are advantageous for quantum sensing and metrology. I present a potted history of this field followed by our proposal for making a nuclear cat state reported in arXiv:2304.13813. About the speaker: Barry Sanders is Scientific Director of Calgary’s “Quantum City”, which is within the University of Calgary and tasked with building a strong quantum ecosystem in Alberta. Dr Sanders’s 1988 Doctor of Philosophy and 2018 Doctor of Science are awarded by Imperial College London, and his theoretical research comprises quantum sensing, quantum and quantum-resilient communication, quantum computing and quantum optics. He held numerous distinguished international visiting professorships and affiliations and is a Scientist with the Creative Destruction Lab at the Universities of Toronto and Calgary. Sanders serves as an Expert with the Canadian Council of Academies and on expert panels in Canada, USA and Europe. Dr Sanders is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, of the United Kingdom Institute of Physics, of the American Physical Society, and of Optica, and he received the City of Calgary International Achievement Award in 2022.
  • 7:05 - 7:20 PM | Group Photo
    Time for a Group Photo!
  • 7:20 - 9:20 PM | Dinner & Networking
    Join us for a Dinner & Networking Session! Location: KAIS 2020/2030
  • 5:30 - 5:50 PM | Lightning Talk by Rahul Deshpande
    Title: Introduction to Annealing Quantum Computing Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: Unlike other types of quantum technology, annealing quantum computing is uniquely suited for solving optimization problems. In this talk, I’ll introduce the basic concepts behind this approach and the hardware implementation at D-Wave using superconducting qubits. I will also briefly discuss scalability, the role of coherence and showcase some of the progress D-Wave has made on these fronts. About the speaker: Rahul Deshpande is a senior experimental physicist at D-Wave, working on developing and characterizing the next generation of superconducting quantum processors. A scientist with a passion for developing new technologies, he completed his PhD in Physics at the University of Waterloo, where he studied nuclear spins in silicon with applications towards quantum computing and quantum sensing at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC).
  • 3:40 - 4:20 PM | Talk by John Donohue
    Title: Qubits 101 Location: KAIS 2020/20230 Abstract: How do we connect the quantum theory of atoms, photons, and electrons to the information processing power of quantum computing? What tools do we need and what features are we really using? In this session for beginners in quantum information science, we’ll overview how we take real quantum mechanical systems and use them to encode, manipulate, and process quantum bits. We’ll show how we can model a range of systems with the same simple linear algebra and get at the essence of what makes quantum bits more powerful than classical bits. About the speaker: Dr. John Donohue is the Senior Manager of Scientific Outreach at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC), a research institute at the University of Waterloo. John is responsible for making quantum science accessible for everyone, including through educational programs like the Undergraduate School on Experimental Quantum Information Processing (USEQIP). John earned his PhD from the University of Waterloo in 2016 for work in quantum optics.
  • 3.30 - 3:40 PM | Opening Remarks
    Location: KAIS 2020/2030
  • 10:00 - 10:45 AM | Talk by Lukas Chrostowski
    Title: Quantum Silicon Photonics Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: Photonic integrated circuits, implemented in silicon, have become a mainstream technology for providing high-speed optical communication links within data centres. Other applications include various sensors (LIDAR, biomedical, environment), optical computing, and quantum information processing. Perhaps the most ambitious application for integrated photonics is in quantum computing. Photonics can be used for the computation itself (e.g. PsiQuantum, Xanadu), or can be an enabling technology to couple between spin qubits to build scalable hybrid photonic-spin quantum processors (the SFU-UBC SiQL CFI project, Photonic Inc.). Finally, photonics can be used for what it does best – optical communications – to build quantum communication links between quantum processors and quantum sensors. This talk will discuss research to develop the ingredients necessary for these technologies. This includes novel fabrication techniques using electron beam lithography (SiEPICfab consortium), the design of devices such as single photon sources, single photon detectors, and tunable high-Q resonators for spin qubits, and building instrumentation to test these devices and circuits including cryogenic probe stations and cryogenic photonic packaging. About the speaker: Lukas Chrostowski is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of British Columbia, and co-founder of Dream Photonics Inc. Through his research in silicon photonics, optoelectronics, high-speed laser design, fabrication and test, for applications in optical communications, biophotonics, and quantum photonics, he has published more than 300 journal and conference publications. He co-authored the book “Silicon Photonics Design” (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Dr. Chrostowski was the co-director of the Advanced Materials and Process Engineering Laboratory (AMPEL) Nanofabrication Facility (ANF), 2008-2016. Dr. Chrostowski was the Program Director of the NSERC CREATE Silicon Electronic-Photonic Integrated Circuits (Si-EPIC) training program in Canada, and has been teaching numerous silicon photonics workshops and courses since 2008, which continue today as the SiEPICfab consortium. Chrostowski received the Killam Teaching Prize at the University of British Columbia in 2014, IEEE Photonics Society Technical Skills Educator Award in 2021, and IEEE Canada's J.M Ham Outstanding Engineering Educator Award in 2021. He was an elected member of the IEEE Photonics Society 2014-2016 Board of Governors. He was elected to the college of the Royal Society of Canada in 2019. Chrostowski is the Program Director for the NSERC CREATE 2020-2026 Quantum Computing program (Quantum BC), co-leading the Quantum Silicon Photonics design-fabricate-test workshop.
  • 6:30 PM - 12:00 AM | Mini-Challenges Coding Time & Pizza
    Time to solve some Mini-Challenges!
  • 9:15 - 9:55 AM | Talk by Roman Krems
    Title: Can quantum computers enhance machine learning? Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: In this talk, I will describe how quantum computing and machine learning can be combined to solve a machine learning problem that cannot be solved on a classical computer. This will illustrate the quantum advantage of quantum machine learning. I will then discuss how to build optimal quantum machine learning models for practical applications. In particular, I will show how to increase the complexity of quantum models in order to improve their ability to infer from limited data. I will conclude by a discussion of the title question. About the speaker: Roman Krems is a Professor of Chemistry and Distinguished University Scholar at the University of British Columbia. He is also a member of the computer science department at UBC and a principal investigator at theStewart Blusson Quantum Matter Institute. His work is at the intersection of quantum physics, machine learning and chemistry on problems of relevance to quantum materials and quantum technologies. He is particularly excited about applications of machine learning for solving complex quantum problems and applications of quantum hardware for machine learning. He is Fellow of the American Physical Society and Member of the College of the Royal Society of Canada.
  • 11:35 - 11:50 AM | Lightning Talk by John Donohue (IQC)
    Title: Opportunities at the Institute for Quantum Computing Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: The Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) is a research institute at the University of Waterloo advancing the field of quantum information science. We will overview opportunities for undergraduate students at IQC, including graduate programs in science, engineering, and mathematics as well as the Undergraduate School for Experimental Quantum Information Processing (USEQIP). About the speaker: Dr. John Donohue is the Senior Manager of Scientific Outreach at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC), a research institute at the University of Waterloo. John is responsible for making quantum science accessible for everyone, including through educational programs like the Undergraduate School on Experimental Quantum Information Processing (USEQIP). John earned his PhD from the University of Waterloo in 2016 for work in quantum optics.
  • UPDATED | 4:00 - 4:40 PM | Talk by Katanya Kuntz
    Title: Meet QUINT! The QEYSSat User Investigation Team - Update on the QEYSSat mission Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: I will update on Canada's first Quantum Satellite Mission - the Quantum EncrYption and Science Satellite (QEYSSat). The Canadian Space Agency is preparing to launch QEYSSat in 2025, which will circle the Earth in low-earth orbit (500 km above the ground), and measure individual packets of light (photons) sent from telescopes on the ground up to space. QEYSSat will demonstrate secure communication across Canada using quantum links, and help us explore foundational concepts in physics that cannot be tested on Earth. I will introduce our new QUINT consortium: a five Year NSERC Quantum Alliance grant to support QEYSSat science activities for the Canadian Science Team. About the speaker: Katanya Kuntz (PhD) is a Research Associate at the Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Canada, and the QEYSSat Science Team Coordinator for Canada’s first quantum satellite mission: Quantum EncrYption and Science Satellite (QEYSSat). Katanya received her PhD in Electrical Engineering (Quantum Optics) from the University of New South Wales, Australia, and BSc in Physics from the University of Calgary. She is also the co-founder and CEO of Qubo Consulting Corp., a quantum education company that teaches businesses and organizations to get them quantum literate.
  • 10:50 - 11.30 AM | Classiq workshop by Erik Garcell
    Location: KAIS 2020/2030 About the speaker: Dr. Erik Garcell is technical marketing manager at Classiq, which is revolutionizing the process of developing quantum computing software by taking quantum software to a higher level. Dr. Garcell was previously innovation product manager for IP.com and an innovation research scientist at Kodak Alaris. He has a doctorate in physics from the University of Rochester and a Master of Science in Technical Entrepreneurship & Management from the University of Rochester’s Simon School of Business.
  • 9:10 - 9:15 AM | Opening Remarks
    Location: KAIS 2020/2030
  • 4:45 - 5.25 PM | Quantum Career Panel
    Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Moderator: John Donohue Panelists: Thomas Baker, Mark Jackson, Rio Weil
  • 11:55 AM - 12.35 PM | Qiskit workshop
    Title: Qiskit workshop Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Come join the Qiskit hands-on workshop to learn the fundamentals of programming a quantum computer. Learn how to create quantum circuits visually using Circuit Composer IBM Quantum platform, and programmatically, using open source Qiskit framework. Run your circuits on quantum simulators and real quantum computers. To get the best experience out of the workshop, sign-up for a free account on IBM Quantum platform beforehand at https://quantum-computing.ibm.com/ About the speaker: Hemavathi Santhanam is an IBM Quantum Ambassador and a Qiskit Advocate. As for her day job, Hema is a Delivery Consultant at IBM Expert Labs building enterprise solutions around Data Governance and AI with IBM Cloud Pak for Data. She is a graduate in Computing and Data Analytics from Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
  • 8:30 - 9:10 AM | Registration and Snacks
    Location: KAIS 2020/2030
  • 2:20 - 3.00 PM | Talk by Peter Hoyer
    Title: The use of quantum computers in cryptography, computation, and communication Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: We discuss the use of quantum algorithms in three areas: cryptography, computations, and communication. We discuss three aspects: how quantum algorithms can help, the problems for which they can help, and the problems for which they offer no benefits. We give examples of all cases. We discuss which existing crypto-systems are vulnerable or resilient against quantum attacks. We give examples of collaborative communication tasks where quantum communication helps. We conclude by characterizing which tasks and problems are currently believed to be aided by quantum computers. About the speaker: Peter Hoyer is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Calgary. His research is on quantum algorithms, quantum complexity theory, quantum communication, and quantum cryptography. He is a co-discoverer of quantum amplitude amplification, which is a core tool in the design of quantum algorithms and protocols. He has won several student awards for his teaching in computer science. He holds a PhD from University of Southern Denmark.
  • 3:15 - 3:55 PM | Good Chemistry Workshop by Valentin Senicourt
    Title: Good Chemistry Workshop - Harnessing software for quantum computing research: an application to quantum chemistry simulations Location: KAIS 2020/2030 About the workshop: The field of quantum computing has gained a lot of momentum, and software has been key in both training a global quantum workforce and propelling the research community. Our ability to use and design tools harnessing a constant stream of innovation scattered across many software projects, widely led by enthusiastic open-source communities, plays an essential role in pushing the state of the art. A lot of work in both hardware and algorithm development remains necessary in order to reliably apply quantum computing to solve practical use cases. Applied research in the NISQ era requires software able to express complex workflows making use cases amenable to current devices and simulators, while providing researchers with the ability to explore new avenues and integrate their innovations. It requires the development of software that can harness the latest innovations to keep up with the state of the art. In this talk, Valentin Senicourt discusses how Good Chemistry is tackling this challenge in the simulation of chemical systems, through the open-source project Tangelo, a python package enabling quantum chemistry workflows on quantum computers and simulators. The content of this session is applicable to fields other than chemistry simulations, and no background in chemistry is required. About the speaker: Valentin Senicourt is the Quantum Software Lead at Good Chemistry. He leads the development of Tangelo, their open-source python package enabling quantum chemistry simulations on quantum computers. Formerly a mathematics teacher, he then started a career in numerical modeling and High-Performance Computing, spanning 10 years of international experience in various fields (oil and gas, finance, medical imaging, chemistry…), and has been part of the quantum computing community for 5 years. Although he is fond of advanced computing technologies, Valentin has a pragmatic approach to problem solving and believes those tools are simply a means to an end: collaborating with other human beings to tackle challenging problems is what drives him.
  • 5:30 - 6:30 PM | IQC Pop-Up Exhibition & Poster Session & Networking
    Location: KAIS 2020/2030
  • 1.35 - 2.15 PM | Talk by Thomas Baker
    Title: Information Theory in Quantum Mechanics Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: Whether making a call on your cellphone or encrypting information to send to someone, information theory plays a critical role in both secret codes and making sure messages get from a sender to a receiver. There is a deep connection with the several fields in physics and information theory. The question I cover in this talk is how information theory plays a role in quantum physics. Inherently, quantum mechanics is uncertain, but we can quantify exactly how uncertain we are. By assigning a definitive meaning to the entropy in physics, we discover a pathway to generating algorithms that solve quantum systems. In this talk, I discuss how formulations of the density matrix, which is used to compute the quantum entanglement in a system can play a crucial role in algorithms for both classical and quantum computers. About the speaker: Thomas E. Baker holds a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Quantum Computing for Modelling of Molecules and Materials in the Department of Physics & Astronomy and also the Department of Chemistry at the University of Victoria. He is also an affiliate member of the Centre for Advanced Materials and Related Technologies (CAMTEC) at the University of Victoria. His research is focused on the design and use of a quantum computer, with research methods and techniques spanning all areas of quantum computing. He has a broad background in density functional theory, quantum algorithms, and entanglement renormalization methods. He is the lead-developer of DMRjulia, a computational library for entanglement renormalization. In 2021, he was a Fulbright U.S. Scholar at the University of York in the United Kingdom. From 2017-2020, Prof. Baker was the Prized Postdoctoral Scholar in Quantum Sciences and Technology at Institut quantique à l'Université de Sherbrooke. He is also the recipient of the Pat Beckman Memorial Scholar for the ARCS Foundation during his doctoral studies. While attending the California State University, Long Beach, he earned the Philip J. Old scholarship and sole graduate research fellowship. He has won 7 first-place speaking awards, including the Kennedy Reed Award for Best Theoretical Research by a Graduate Student. He also won the statewide California Student Research Competition in 2012. He wrote scripts for The Loh Down on Science on National Public Radio. Prof. Baker is a member of the education committee for the NSERC CREATE program in Quantum Computing affiliated with Quantum BC. He is the Principal Investigator of the quantum photonics, algorithms, light-matter interactions for technology (QuALITy) collaboration at the University of Victoria. He remains committed to building a diverse research group capable of handling the multitude of challenges related to his wide research interests. He is interested in working with a wide variety of students from all backgrounds.
  • 12:05 - 12:20 PM | Lightning Talk by Jane Dong (IBM)
    Title: Getting Started with Quantum Computing Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: Curious about IBM's Quantum ecosystem and development roadmap? Come learn more about the IBM Quantum Network, Qiskit community and exciting offerings that can empower you with the knowledge and resources you need to begin your quantum computing journey. About the speaker: Jane Dong is an IBM Quantum Ambassador and Digital Enablement Leader for Hybrid Cloud Services. Jane graduated from the University of Toronto specializing in Physics and Mathematics with high distinction. She has solutioned and delivered enterprise level digital solutions for clients across North America. Outside of her Quantum Ambassador role, Jane and her team focus on creating digital, emerging tech and hybrid cloud solutions consulting works the following streams: Solution Envisioning, Proof-of-concept Development, Production Ready Pilot development services for clients in Energy Utilities, Retail, Engineering & Construction, FSS and Public Sectors.
  • 11:25 - 11:40 AM | Lightning Talk by Anna Dyring (CQIQC)
    Title: Quantum Careers Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: I will talk broadly about quantum career paths and how CQIQC supports students through a range of learning and research opportunities in quantum science and technology. I will also share some observations and advice that may help anyone interested in exploring a career in the exciting and growing quantum sector. My goal is to inform, inspire, and challenge. About the speaker: Anna Dyring is the Quantum Strategic Initiative Lead at the Centre for Quantum Information and Quantum Control (CQIQC), UofT’s quantum centre with more than 30 research groups working both theoretically and experimentally on a range of quantum topics. Anna’s previous roles include project/product manager in several aerospace, technical consulting and biotechnology companies, where she led complex product development and delivery projects. She holds an MSc in Engineering Physics from Uppsala University, Sweden and a PhD in High Energy (Particle) Physics from Uppsala University and CERN. Anna has a broad interest in science, technology and the arts, and enjoys working at the intersection of academia, industry and the public sphere.
  • 3:30 - 4.00 PM | Award Ceremony & Closing Remarks
    Location: KAIS 2020/2030
  • 11:05 - 11:20 AM | Talk by Erik Garcell (Classiq)
    Title: Classiq and the Future of Quantum Computing Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: About the speaker: Dr. Erik Garcell is technical marketing manager at Classiq, which is revolutionizing the process of developing quantum computing software by taking quantum software to a higher level. Dr. Garcell was previously innovation product manager for IP.com and an innovation research scientist at Kodak Alaris. He has a doctorate in physics from the University of Rochester and a Master of Science in Technical Entrepreneurship & Management from the University of Rochester’s Simon School of Business.
  • 8:30 - 9:20 AM | Registration
    Location: KAIS 2020/2030
  • 10:15 -11:00 AM | Keynote Talk by Anne Broadbent
    Title: Quantum Unclonability and Cryptography Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: According to the unclonability property of quantum information, it is not possible, in general, to duplicate an unknown quantum state. Quantum cryptography is the science of communication and computation in the presence of an adversary. Because quantum adversaries are also bound by the unclonability property, this creates a myriad of opportunities for quantum cryptographers. We will discuss how unclonability permeates quantum cryptography: from the early findings on quantum money and quantum key distribution, to recent work on unclonable quantum encryption, certified deletion, and unclonable software. About the speaker: Prof. Broadbent is a Full Professor at the University of Ottawa, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, with cross appointments to the Department of Physics and to the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Prof. Broadbent holds the University of Ottawa Research Chair in Quantum Information and Cryptography. Her research relates to cryptography, communication, and information processing in a quantum world. Prof. Broadbent’s research is recognized by multiple awards and accolades, including the University of Ottawa Young Researcher of the Year Award (2019), the Ontario Early Researcher Award (2016), the André Aisenstadt Prize in Mathematics (2016), the John Charles Polanyi Prize (2010) and the NSERC Doctoral Prize (2009).
  • 9:20 - 9:30 AM | Opening Remarks
    Location: KAIS 2020/2030
  • 9:30 - 10:10 AM | Talk by Hoi-Kwon (Kero) Lau
    Title: Beyond qubits: a glimpse at bosonic quantum technologies Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: While qubits are the basic unit in most quantum information devices and applications, there is another class of quantum system that offers infinite states per degree of freedom. Bosonic systems, in this respect, are everywhere and provide loads of practical advantages. In this talk, I will introduce the basics and features of bosonic quantum technologies. I will also briefly introduce our group’s effort in engineering bosonic quantum gates. About the speaker: Kero is a theorist working on the interface of quantum optics and quantum information. After getting his PhD from University of Toronto, Kero was awarded the Croucher Fellowship, and later worked as a postdoc at Max Planck Institute and University of Chicago. In 2020, Kero joined the SFU Department of Physics as an assistant professor. He is also the Canada Research Chair in Quantum Information Science and an affiliate fellow of Quantum Algorithm Institute. Kero focuses on studying the physics of Bosonic quantum systems and how they can be used for information processing. His ultimate goal is to bring quantum technologies to reality.
  • 11:45 AM - 12:00 PM | Lightning Talk by Ara Ghukasyan (Agnostiq)
    Title: Agnostiq: Time Series Anomaly Detection with Quantum Variational Rewinding Location: KAIS 2020/2030 About the talk: A variety of important problems in healthcare, finance, and technology rely on detecting strange, potentially dangerous, sequences of events among normal everyday occurrences. Formally, this is precisely the notion of time series anomaly detection (TAD). Rather than flagging individual events that deviate from the norm – a less difficult problem – a more salient goal here is to identify several events that represent anomalous behaviour when considered in context. In this talk, we present a highly scalable quantum machine learning algorithm for TAD with freely available NISQ hardware. This algorithm, which we refer to as Quantum Variational Rewinding (QVR), relies on training a family of parameterized unitary time-devolution operators to cluster normal time series instances that are encoded within quantum states. In other words, we train a quantum model to “rewind” series-encoding states to initial states which are similar for normal time series, but differ for abnormal ones. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the efficacy of this algorithm on the real-world problem of identifying anomalous transactions in cryptocurrency market data. About the speaker: Ara Ghukasyan is a Research Software Engineer at Agnostiq Inc. (agnostiq.ai). He holds an undergraduate degree in Mathematics & Physics and a Ph.D. in Engineering Physics from McMaster University. Before working in quantum computing, he researched semiconductor hardware and atomistic simulations of nanoscale heat transport. Ara’s casual interests include music, film, and broad topics in science and computation. Ara also enjoys an avid interest in electric guitar and bass.
  • 1:45 - 2:25 PM | Talk by Rogerio De Sousa
    Title: From Quantum Mechanics to Quantum Computers Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: Quantum behavior can be exploited to create a computer that works with superpositions and entangled states of zeros and ones. This so-called quantum computer is exponentially faster than conventional computers for certain problems, most notably the ones requiring linear algebra (e.g. matrix diagonalization and solution of linear systems) and simulation of quantum systems such as molecules and materials. I will give an informal overview of how quantum computer hardware can be made, using "artificial atoms" as quantum bits (qubits) based on superconducting chips. I will show how you can access these systems over the cloud to run your own experiments, and how we use this to teach quantum computing to second year undergraduate students in science and engineering at University of Victoria. Finally, I will give an overview of the problems we are working on in my research group, related to understanding and mitigating the impact of noise in quantum hardware and software. About the speaker: My research is on how to design quantum hardware with less noise, with particular focus on photons and superconducting materials. More recently we also became involved with research related to how to implement quantum algorithms with the cloud-based quantum computers from IBM and D-Wave. I have collaborators at other universities and national labs in multiple countries (Brazil, Canada, France, USA, etc). I have an ongoing collaboration with scientists at D-Wave Systems Inc., where we investigate the sources of noise and how to reduce them in the D-Wave quantum processor. I am also an academic fellow of the British Columbia Quantum Algorithms Institute, based at the Surrey campus of Simon Fraser University. With leading companies in our area (1Qbit, D-Wave, Photonic), our province recognizes the opportunity to develop a quantum ecosystem that can compete worldwide in the development of this exciting new technology. This includes a multi-university effort to form more professionals with expertise in quantum hardware and software. For more information on what is going on in B.C. related to quantum computing, check out our Quantum-BC webpage, http://quantum-bc.ca/ .
  • 2:30 - 3:30 PM | Talk by Joseph Salfi
    Title: Primer on Spin Qubits: State-of-the-art and Challenges Location: KAIS 2020/2030 Abstract: Spin qubits in group-IV materials are an appealing system for building quantum technologies because of their long coherence times and compatibility with industrial manufacturing technologies. The small size of spin qubits is both a blessing and a curse. The small size means that large numbers of qubits necessary to build fault-tolerant quantum computers could in principle be integrated onto a single chip. However, spin qubits are so small that fabricating and controlling them has proven to be more difficult than, for example, superconducting qubits. In this talk I will describe recent progress in an emerging system, spin-orbit qubits in Group-IV materials, which could offer a means to resolve some of these challenges, and in addition, to streamline simulation of materials and chemistry compared to competing systems. I will describe our ongoing efforts to develop spin qubits and superconducting technologies both to explore fundamental physics and build scalable quantum technologies. About the speaker: Joseph Salfi completed a PhD at the University of Toronto in 2011. From 2011 to 2015 he was a postdoc and from 2016 to 2018 was junior faculty at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) and Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, the international epicentre for silicon based qubits. In 2019, he joined the University of British Columbia as faculty. His research interests are in the physics and technology of spin-based quantum computers and quantum simulators.
  • 7:30 PM | Networking Dinner
    Expect an enriching networking experience with dinner to conclude Day 1 of Q-SITE! Connect with fellow quantum enthusiasts, share insights, and forge new collaborations over a delicious meal. Location: Bahen Lobby
  • 2:30 PM | Opening Ceremony
    A quantum leap for ideas to converge, meaningful connections to emerge and memories to make, over the next 3 days! Location: KP108
  • 1:30 PM | Registration and Snacks
    Join us for a delightful pre-conference snack session! Savour delicious bites, mingle with fellow attendees, and fuel up for an inspiring event ahead. Location: Koffler House Lobby
  • 3:30 PM | Aephraim Steinberg - University of Toronto
    Title: Information in Quantum Mechanics Location: KP108 Abstract: As is now well-known, quantum mechanics offers new powerful ways to transmit and process information (quantum cryptography, quantum computing) – but at the same time, the information-theoretic perspective offers a fascinating new window on the rules which govern our universe. In this talk, I will first introduce, at an undergraduate level, some of the surprises revealed by asking how much information a quantum system can carry, or how much information it takes to describe a quantum system. In particular, I will touch on the striking examples of quantum teleportation and quantum error correction, before discussing an experiment we carried out here at Toronto on “quantum data compression.” I will conclude by shifting gears to ask a more philosophical question, about how much one can know about a quantum system at all, and showing a few results from our most recent experiments asking “how long does an atom spend inside a forbidden region?” and “how long do photons spend trapped inside atoms?” About the Speaker: Aephraim Steinberg is a University Professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto. He is also a founding member and past director of the Centre for Quantum Information and Quantum Control (CQIQC), and currently Director of the CIFAR programme in Quantum Information Science. Dr. Steinberg received his undergraduate degree from Yale University, where he worked with Ed Hinds, before spending a year as a research assistant in Serge Haroche’s group at the Ecole Normale Supérieure. He went on to work with Ray Chiao at the University of California at Berkeley, carrying out his Ph.D. research on superluminal tunneling. He then held post-doctoral fellowships at the Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel (Université de Paris VI) working in Elisabeth Giacobino & Claude Fabre’s group; and the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology, where he learned the ropes of laser cooling in the group of Bill Phillips. He joined U of T’s Physics Department in 1996. He has won numerous awards, ranging from the APS doctoral thesis prize in AMO Physics to a Steacie Fellowship. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Physics (UK), the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America, and the Royal Society of Canada. Dr. Steinberg’s interests focus on foundational issues in quantum mechanics, as well as their application to tasks ranging from information processing to precision measurement. His experimental program is two-pronged, using atoms cooled down to a billionth of a degree above absolute zero as well as entangled photon pairs, to study issues such as quantum measurement and the nature of the past in quantum mechanics, quantum information & computation, tunneling times, and the control and characterization of novel quantum states. His group’s Science paper on using weak measurement to observe the "average trajectories” of single photons in a two-slit interferometer was selected by Physics World as the "breakthrough of 2011.” In 2014, his paper on quantum data compression was listed as one of the top 10 breakthroughs of the year.
  • 5:30 PM | Lab Tours
    Welcome to the University of Toronto's research lab tour hosted by Q-SITE, where you'll gain firsthand insight into cutting-edge research and innovations. Led by highly experienced professors, this tour promises an exceptional and enlightening experience. The professors and grad students leading the tour are more than happy to answer any questions you may have about their research, methodologies, or the broader implications of their work. Through this tour, you'll not only gain valuable knowledge about various research domains but also witness the passion and dedication of these academics as they strive to make meaningful contributions to their respective fields. Location: KP108 Professors: Sorin Voinigescu Guide: Suyash Pati Tripathi Research Interests: CMOS Quantum Dots in FDSOI and FinFET for Spin-Qubit Quantum Processors Lab: BA5159 Professor: Li Qian Guide: Reem Mandil and Alex Greenwood Research Interests: Experimental Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) and Fiber-Based Entangled Photon Sources Lab: SF4101 Professor: Boris Braverman Research Interests: Quantum Optics and Condensed Matter Physics Lab: MP1108A Professors: Aephraim Steinberg Guide: Andy Jiao Research Interests: Laser-Cooling Lab Lab: MP054 Professors: Aephraim Steinberg Guide: Batuhan Yilmaz Research Interests: Entangled-Photons Lab Lab: MP056 Professor: Sergio de la Barrera Guide: Nicco Spano Research Interests: Superconductivity and Condensed Matter Physics Lab: MP089
  • 5:05 PM | Hayley McKay - Mitacs
    Title: Supporting the Canadian Quantum Ecosystem Through Collaborative R&D Partnerships. Location: KP108 Abstract: Mitacs is a national, independent not-for-profit organization with a mandate to create and support R&D collaborations between academic institutions and industry partners. Through the various funding programs which will be outlined in this talk, Mitacs provides experiential learning opportunities for students to take part in innovative R&D activities with partner organizations in the form of paid internships. Mitacs is especially committed to fostering growth in the Canadian quantum ecosystem, with exclusive programming available for collaborations that develop talent and new ventures in the quantum sector. About the Speaker: Hayley McKay is a Business Development Advisor with Mitacs, a national not-for-profit organization that provides R&D funding to support academic-industry collaborations and international academic travel. Hayley works closely with professors and students at the University of Toronto and industry partners across the country to build mutually beneficial, long-term research partnerships that drive innovation in Canada. With a background in molecular genetics and science communication, Hayley is passionate about interdisciplinary learning and turning academic research into innovative solutions for today’s societal challenges.
  • 2:45 PM | Alex Greenwood
    Title: Quantum Computing: A Brief Introduction Location: KP108 Abstract: Over the past few decades, great strides have been made in the development of noisy intermediate-scale quantum (NISQ) devices for their promised applications in fields including, but not limited to, cryptography, physical simulation, and machine learning. This talk aims to elucidate the current state of the art of quantum computing: its significance, challenges, and an overview of hardware platforms that are available today. No prior knowledge of quantum technologies is expected of attendees. About the Speaker: Alexander Greenwood received his BASc (with honours) and MASc in from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Toronto in 2021 and 2023 respectively. His master's thesis was concerned with the detection of multipartite entangled states using entanglement witnesses derived with Support Vector Machines (SVMs). Alex is currently a PhD candidate under the supervision of Prof. Li Qian and serves as the vice president of the Optica student chapter at the University of Toronto.
  • 4:20 PM | Hoi Kwong Lo - University of Toronto
    Title: The Quantum Threat to Cyber-security and How to Counter it Location: KP108 Abstract: Cryptographically relevant quantum computers (CRQC) can break standard encryption schemes and forge digital identity and digital signatures, thus creating chaos in our financial transactions and threatening the security of our critical infrastructure. Large IT corporations such as Google and IBM are racing to build CRQC, possibly by 2030. Indeed, the “harvest now and decrypt later” attack may threaten our communication security even today. In this talk, I will review the quantum threat to cyber-security. Moreover, I will briefly review the three classes of methods to counter this quantum threat including quantum-resistant conventional cryptography (often called post-quantum cryptography (PQC)), quantum key distribution (QKD), and pre-shared keys (PSK). I argue that they form the three pillars needed to address this immense security challenge. About the Speaker: Prof. Hoi-Kwong Lo is a Professor of Physics and Electrical and Computing Engineering at the U. of T. He is also a co-founder and CTO of Quantum Bridge. He received his B.A. in Mathematics from Cambridge University and Ph.D. in Physics at Caltech in 1989 and 1994 respectively. After working at institutions such as the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS), Princeton, New Jersey, USA, Hewlett-Packard Lab, Bristol, UK, and MagiQ Technologies, Inc., New York, NY, he became an Associate Professor at the U. of Toronto in 2003 and was promoted to Full Professor in 2009. Prof. Lo performs research in the theory and experiment of quantum cryptography. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and Optica Fellow, and he has received numerous awards including the Outstanding Young Researcher Award (OYRA) by the OCPA (the International Organization of Chinese Physicists and Astronomers) in 2003, the 2022 CAP-INO Medal for Outstanding Achievement in Applied Photonics and the 2023 IEEE Photonics Society Quantum Electronics Award.
  • 9 AM | Registration and Snacks
    Join us once again in the Bahen Lobby for a quantum-powered snack break before an electrifying Day 2 at Q-SITE! Location: Bahen Centre for Information Technology
  • 10:10 AM | Reem Mandil - University of Toronto
    Title: A Brief History of Quantum Cryptography Location: BA1130 Abstract: The contest between code-makers and code-breakers has existed for centuries. Now, quantum mechanics is a powerful tool at the code-maker’s disposal. That is because quantum cryptography promises unconditional security in the face of an all-powerful adversary—in theory. This talk will explore the history of using quantum states (primarily photons) to encode and communicate information such that malicious activity can be detected, with a focus on a particular application of quantum cryptography called quantum key distribution (QKD). About the Speaker: Reem is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto. Her research focuses on experimental twin-field QKD and QKD networks. She is co-supervised by Prof. Hoi-Kwong Lo and Prof. Li Qian.
  • 6:30 PM | Social Night
    Unwind and bond quantum-style at our Q-SITE Social Night! Enjoy delicious pizzas, face fun challenges and forge lasting connections. Join us for an unforgettable evening of networking and laughter. Location: BA2155
  • 2:35 PM | John Donohue - Institute for Quantum Computing [Vancouver]
    Title: Opportunities at the Institute for Quantum Computing Location: BA1130 Abstract: The Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) is a research institute at the University of Waterloo advancing the field of quantum information science. We will overview opportunities for undergraduate students at IQC, including graduate programs in science, engineering, and mathematics as well as the Undergraduate School for Experimental Quantum Information Processing (USEQIP). About the Speaker: Dr. John Donohue is the Senior Manager of Scientific Outreach at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC), a research institute at the University of Waterloo. John is responsible for making quantum science accessible for everyone, including through educational programs like the Undergraduate School on Experimental Quantum Information Processing (USEQIP). John earned his PhD from the University of Waterloo in 2016 for work in quantum optics.
  • 1:50 PM | Dr. Erik Garcell - Classiq [Workshop]
    Title: Mastering Quantum Computing with Classiq: A Hands-On Workshop Location: BA1130 About the Speaker: Dr. Erik Garcell is technical marketing manager at Classiq, which is revolutionizing the process of developing quantum computing software by taking quantum software to a higher level. Dr. Garcell was previously innovation product manager for IP.com and an innovation research scientist at Kodak Alaris. He has a doctorate in physics from the University of Rochester and a Master of Science in Technical Entrepreneurship & Management from the University of Rochester’s Simon School of Business.
  • 3:55 PM | Alvaro Ballon Bordo - Xanadu
    Title: Introduction to Quantum Machine Learning using PennyLane Location: BA1130 Abstract: The purpose of this session is to learn PennyLane using a hands-on approach. First, we will become familiar with PennyLane's paradigms for simulating simple quantum circuits. Building on this knowledge, we create our first variational circuit and optimize a cost function to find the ground energy of a Hamiltonian. Finally, and if time permits it, we build a variational quantum classifier from scratch to showcase the machine learning applications of quantum computing. About the Speaker: Alvaro Ballon Bordo holds a Physics PhD from the University of Waterloo. He is currently a Quantum Computing Educator at Xanadu, where he creates educational content to make the discipline of quantum programming accessible to the community at large. His main interests include the foundations of quantum mechanics, quantum information theory, and the near-term applications of quantum computing.
  • 11:50 AM | Group Photo
    Gather at the Bahen waterfall to immortalize the spirit of Q-SITE and capture it in a group photo! Location: Bahen Centre for Information Technology
  • 5:30 PM | Grad Fair + Poster Sessions
    Explore groundbreaking research, gain insightful knowledge about your future in quantum and make meaningful connections all at Q-SITE's Grad Fair + Poster Session in the Bahen Lobby. Location: Bahen Centre for Information Technology Student: Cristina Rodriguez Title: Platonic Ququart Benchmarking. Abstract: The study of 4-level quantum systems, or ququarts, is of paramount importance in the field of quantum computing. These systems exhibit unique quantum behavior and possess certain advantages over qubits, like increased information capacity and quantum advantage in specific algorithms. It is therefore essential to explore the potential of these types of systems. Understanding and characterizing their behavior through benchmarking protocols are fundamental steps toward this goal. Randomized benchmarking has emerged as a valuable tool for assessing and mitigating errors in quantum gates. In this project, we implement character randomized benchmarking within a 4-level quantum system to assess and mitigate errors in quantum gates. Unlike the standard randomized benchmarking, character randomized benchmarking is essential for systems with complex decay processes. Our approach involves implementing three distinct gate groups based on the symmetries of platonic solids: the tetrahedral, octahedral, and icosahedral groups. These groups present unique challenges due to the non-multiplicity-free nature of their irreducible representations. The experimental implementation is carried out using liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to control and manipulate quantum states within the 4-level system. Liquid-state NMR offers reliable control over quantum states allowing us to manipulate our 4-level system with precision. Our work not only highlights the significance of character randomized benchmarking in evaluating and enhancing the reliability of quantum gates but also emphasizes the relevance of studying 4-level quantum systems, which are integral to the advancement of quantum computing technology with potential applications across a wide range of scientific and computational fields. Student: Anton Sugolov Title: Quantum Circuit Architecture Selection via Local Optimization towards Quantum Machine Learning of Chemical Bond Dissociation Energy. Abstract: Quantum machine learning (QML) or variational quantum algorithms (VQA) for regression are a growing research area with immense impact for chemical applications. The trainability and expressibility of quantum regression models are determined by the sequence of gate operations (ansatz) of the model circuit implementation. Standard circuit ansatze are used for QML, yet the optimal ansatz is completely regression task dependent. We propose a local search approach towards task-specific ansatz selection from a candidate ansatz. Given a candidate ansatz: (i) the sequence of gate operations is probabilistically altered to yield a sample of similar ansatze, (ii) the sample is trained and top circuits are selected, (iii) new circuits are re-sampled from top circuits. The process proceeds iteratively and is parametrized by (i) probabilities of gate changes occuring (iteration-level change) and (ii) decay in change probability (global deviation from candidate). Current literature randomly samples from the search space of ansatze and involves training a model (NSGA-II, GNN) to learn performance given structure of the sampled circuits (Y. Du, 2022 and Z. He, 2023). Our framework is more scalable to larger ansatze since it avoids sparse sampling, circuit representation learning, and meta-learning of models. Student: Nicholas Taylor Title: Quantum Machine Learning for Regression Tasks in Computational Chemistry. Abstract: The rapid growth of quantum computing has seen a rise in the development of applicable near-term quantum algorithms. A promising candidate to run on current noisy intermediate-scale quantum (NISQ) hardware is quantum machine learning (QML). Parameterized quantum circuits can be learned as models in a hybrid classical-quantum approach. It has been shown that QML models may need less training data to generalize compared to classical methods. Although QML has been explored largely within classification tasks, regression tasks have received much less attention. Existing studies have only utilized few qubits and lack relevant practical applications. We will discuss our work on the development and comparisons of QML models for highly desired prediction of chemical properties such as bond dissociation energies and barrier height energies. Our work investigates the trainability, expressibility, and generalization capability of various quantum models for the purpose of regression of molecular properties. We benchmark various encoding and variational subcircuits to examine their effects on our specific task. Additionally, the effects of repeated layers of encoding are explored and being found to provide better fitting models across our trials. Our work also provides a benchmark against classical machine learning models and implications of using error mitigation techniques for QML. Student: Katherine Latosinsky Title: A Tunnel Oscillating Diode Circuit for Measuring Superconductivity. Abstract: This research project involves designing a tunnel diode oscillator circuit for contactless measurement of the London penetration depth in superconducting materials. A tunnel diode operates on the principle of quantum mechanical tunnelling, allowing thermally excited electrons to tunnel through the thin depletion region at low voltages. This causes a peak in the diode's I-V characteristic followed by a region of negative differential resistance. This unique quantum behaviour allows the creation of an LC circuit with a stable resonance at GHz frequencies. When a material sample is placed inside a connected inductor, the resonance frequency becomes dependent on the electromagnetic properties of the material, characterized by its London penetration depth. This measurement technique has been successfully applied by several research groups globally. It avoids the need to directly attach electrodes to the sample, and is well-suited for our intended application measuring samples with sub-millimeter diameters subjected to extreme pressures in a diamond anvil cell. The poster will primarily detail the physics of the tunnel diode that makes this circuit possible, as well as the circuit operation. This provides an excellent example of a practical application of quantum tunneling. There will also be some discussion of the intended measurements and applications in the field of condensed matter physics. Student: Adam Martinez Title: Photoluminescence Excitation Spectroscopy of Tin Vacancy Centres for Quantum Networks Abstract: Characterization of group IV defects diamond's electronic structure is an important first step in determining their applicability as a quantum information processing platform. Defect centres platform have long coherence times, robust to noisy environments, and are easily scalable and integratable with semiconductor technologies, making them an attractive candidate. When manufacturing this defect, the energy transitions can substantially vary due to crystal strain and external magnetic fields. Hence, photoillumence excitation spectroscopy (PLE) is required to characterize the two spin conserving optical active transitions of interest. Presented here is the design and assessment of a PLE optical system for SnV centres in diamond. A tunable 1240nm CW external cavity semiconductor laser coupled to a second harmonic generator (SHG) is used to scan over 20 GHz with up to 1 MHz resolution. Careful attention to establishing a mod hop free scanning range with frequency and power stabilization techniques are discussed. A second non resonant 520nm diode CW laser is also used and optical focused into a Montana cryostat at 4K. Emitted photons are collected using a single-photon avalanche detector and the spectrum analyzed. Introduction of acousto-optic modulators for power stabilization and control between 520nm and 620nm as a possible next step in discussed. Student: Nishaant Jacobus Title: Controlling Non-Equilibrium Steady States via Environmental Tuning. Abstract: While isolated quantum systems undergo unitary evolution as described by the Schrödinger Equation, these dynamics are significantly altered when these systems interact with their environment. Elucidating the behavior of these open quantum systems has many applications, including the realization of quantum computing and understanding the role of quantum mechanics in biological processes such as light harvesting and vision. In particular, environmental influences allow these systems to attain non-equilibrium steady states (NESS) that show strong dependencies on the properties of the closed system. For instance, we have shown computationally that the quantum yield of the photoisomerization of rhodopsin, the first step of vision, has a sensitive dependence on closed system parameters such as the electronic energy gap. Further studies on a broader family of models such as the Rabi Model showed that this sensitivity is a general property of open systems, with spikes in flux rates correlated with low-energy avoided crossings. Given this strong dependence of the NESS on the properties of the system, a natural follow-up question is whether the NESS exhibits a similar dependence on the environment; namely, for a fixed system, can we control the steady state by tuning the system-environment coupling? To investigate this question, we numerically examine the steady state properties of exciton transport in the Holstein Model, a chain of sites coupled to local harmonic modes that could represent scenarios such as energy transport in polymers. We find that the steady-state exciton populations can be controlled by tuning the dissipation strength of the environment, and we note an interesting parallel between this steady state behavior and the transient dynamics of the system. These results suggest that it may be possible to optimize the performance of a quantum system by engineering the environment appropriately.
  • 1:00 PM | Lukas Chrostowski - University of British Columbia [Vancouver]
    Title: Quantum Silicon Photonics Location: BA1130 Abstract: Photonic integrated circuits, implemented in silicon, have become a mainstream technology for providing high-speed optical communication links within data centres. Other applications include various sensors (LIDAR, biomedical, environment), optical computing, and quantum information processing. Perhaps the most ambitious application for integrated photonics is in quantum computing. Photonics can be used for the computation itself (e.g. PsiQuantum, Xanadu), or can be an enabling technology to couple between spin qubits to build scalable hybrid photonic-spin quantum processors (the SFU-UBC SiQL CFI project, Photonic Inc.). Finally, photonics can be used for what it does best – optical communications – to build quantum communication links between quantum processors and quantum sensors. This talk will discuss research to develop the ingredients necessary for these technologies. This includes novel fabrication techniques using electron beam lithography (SiEPICfab consortium), the design of devices such as single photon sources, single photon detectors, and tunable high-Q resonators for spin qubits, and building instrumentation to test these devices and circuits including cryogenic probe stations and cryogenic photonic packaging. About the Speaker: Lukas Chrostowski is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of British Columbia, and co-founder of Dream Photonics Inc. Through his research in silicon photonics, optoelectronics, high-speed laser design, fabrication and test, for applications in optical communications, biophotonics, and quantum photonics, he has published more than 300 journal and conference publications. He co-authored the book “Silicon Photonics Design” (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Dr. Chrostowski was the co-director of the Advanced Materials and Process Engineering Laboratory (AMPEL) Nanofabrication Facility (ANF), 2008-2016. Dr. Chrostowski was the Program Director of the NSERC CREATE Silicon Electronic-Photonic Integrated Circuits (Si-EPIC) training program in Canada, and has been teaching numerous silicon photonics workshops and courses since 2008, which continue today as the SiEPICfab consortium. Chrostowski received the Killam Teaching Prize at the University of British Columbia in 2014, IEEE Photonics Society Technical Skills Educator Award in 2021, and IEEE Canada's J.M Ham Outstanding Engineering Educator Award in 2021. He was an elected member of the IEEE Photonics Society 2014-2016 Board of Governors. He was elected to the college of the Royal Society of Canada in 2019. Chrostowski is the Program Director for the NSERC CREATE 2020-2026 Quantum Computing program (Quantum BC), co-leading the Quantum Silicon Photonics design-fabricate-test workshop.
  • 4:45 PM | Upper Years Talk
    Unlock your future in the quantum realm with these upper year students as they delve into their journey navigating the space for the first time! Location: BA1160 Moderator: Vivek Dhande About the Moderator: Vivek Dhande is a University of Toronto BASc Engineering Science student specializing in Engineering Physics. His research specializes in DFT simulation of scaled semiconductor quantum dot devices in production FinFET and FDSOI CMOS technologies for spin-qubit quantum computing. Vivek is currently completing his PEY Co-Op at Xanadu as a Tools intern, supporting various hardware simulation packages. Vivek also leads the University of Toronto Quantum Computing (UTQC) club, where he continues to give the qLearn Quantum Hardware lecture series and organize student initiatives for spreading undergraduate quantum awareness at UofT. He is also the co-chair of the Q-SITE conference and UofT's representing member of Qubit by Qubit’s University Quantum Network. Speaker: Reem Mandil About the Speaker: Reem is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto. Her research focuses on experimental twin-field QKD and QKD networks. She is co-supervised by Prof. Hoi-Kwong Lo and Prof. Li Qian. Speaker: Noorain Noorani About the Speaker: Noorain Noorani is an Associate Data Scientist Researcher at the Bank of Canada's Quantum Lab for Advanced Analytics. He graduated with a degree in Engineering Physics from Carleton University in April 2023 and began his journey with the Bank as an intern in September 2021, transitioning to a full-time role in May 2022 while completing his studies. Notably, Noorain led a collaborative project with Carleton University and the Bank of Canada, using quantum computing to solve differential equations found in both physics and economics. While at the Bank Noorain has worked on a broad range of topics including: Quantum Natural Language Processing to classify receipt descriptions that can be used better predict inflation, using quantum machine learning for anomaly detection in time series data, and the use of quantum annealers to optimize payments systems between financial institutions. Speaker: Danial Motlagh About the Speaker: Danial Motlagh, a Computer Science undergrad at the University of Toronto, is riding the quantum wave and loving every qubit of it! He's been dabbling in all things quantum — from algorithms and chemistry to machine learning. He's been doing quantum computing research with Dr. Nathan Wiebe & Dr. Alan Aspuru Guzik at U of T while further cementing his presence beyond the academic sphere. He completed a quantum machine learning internship at Zapata, and then joined Xanadu's residency program this summer after which he got an offer to join Xanadu as a Quantum Algorithms Scientist this fall where he works to develop new and better quantum algorithms for simulating molecules and materials. Now, he's juggling algorithms by day and textbooks by night as he wraps up his degree. Speaker: Viki Prasad About the Speaker: Dr. Viki Kumar Prasad is currently appointed as a postdoctoral research fellow in the Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. His research focuses on methodological developments at the intersection of quantum computing, machine learning, and computational chemistry, funded by the Data Science Institute at the University of Toronto. Dr. Prasad holds a Ph.D. in theoretical and quantum chemistry from the University of British Columbia.
  • 11:00 AM | David Gosset - University of Waterloo
    Title: Classical Simulation Algorithms versus Quantum Computers Location: BA1130 Abstract: In the long run, large-scale quantum computers may be built that are capable of implementing quantum algorithms that achieve dramatic speedups for certain tasks. Quantum computers that exist today are restricted in their capabilities and understanding if and how they can outperform classical computers is an ongoing research effort. In this talk I will describe some recent work that has developed new tools for classical simulation of restricted types of quantum computations and how they have helped refine our understanding of the boundary between quantum and classical computation. About the Speaker: David Gosset is a quantum computer scientist who is interested in quantum algorithms and complexity theory. He has worked on theoretical questions relevant to small quantum computers, including understanding the computational power of constant-depth quantum circuits and the limits of classical simulation algorithms. He has also investigated the computational power and complexity of quantum many-body systems, and the application of physics-inspired tools from these areas to quantum computer science. He is a faculty member at the Institute for Quantum Computing at the University of Waterloo, associate faculty at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, and a fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.
  • 2:55 PM | Hemavathi Santhanam - IBM Quantum & Qiskit
    Title: Qiskit Workshop Location: BA1130 Abstract: Come join the Qiskit hands-on workshop to learn the fundamentals of programming a quantum computer. Learn how to create quantum circuits visually using Circuit Composer IBM Quantum platform, and programmatically, using open source Qiskit framework. Run your circuits on quantum simulators and real quantum computer. To get the best experience out of the workshop, sign-up for a free account on IBM Quantum platform beforehand at https://quantum-computing.ibm.com/. About the Speaker: Hemavathi Santhanam is an IBM Quantum Ambassador and a Qiskit Advocate. As for her day job, Hema is a Delivery Consultant at IBM Expert Labs building enterprise solutions around Data Governance and AI with IBM Cloud Pak for Data. She is a graduate in Computing and Data Analytics from Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
  • 4:10 PM | Brianna Lee - Creative Destruction Lab
    Title: Destruction Lab - Building Quantum Startups Location: BA1130 Abstract: CDL is an objective-based mentorship program for science- and technology- based startups. The CDL Quantum program has supported about 1/5 of all quantum startups worldwide through a technical and business training bootcamp and mentorship from leading Quantum operators, investors and scientists. Companies including Xanadu, OTI Lumionics and Multiverse Computing have come through the CDL Quantum Program at their earliest stage of development. They have since grown to raise large rounds and be integral parts to the Quantum ecosystem. About the Speaker: Brianna is a Venture Manager and Recruitment Lead at the Creative Destruction Lab’s Quantum Stream. Prior to joining the Quantum team, she led CDL-Seattle recruitment of its first cohort of computational health companies. She has a Bachelor of Commerce from the University of Toronto under the Management Specialist with a double focus in Finance and Strategy & Innovation.
  • 10:50 AM | Amir Karamlou - Google Quantum
    Title: Quantum simulation of many-body systems with superconducting qubits. Location: BA1130 Abstract: Many-body quantum systems exhibit rich fundamental physics, however, they are often difficult to study analytically, and computationally intractable to simulate using a classical computer. Superconducting quantum circuits have emerged as promising and well-controlled quantum hardware capable of simulating many-body quantum systems. In this talk I will discuss the basics of superconducting qubits, and using a superconducting quantum processor for quantum simulation. In addition, I will present our results utilizing superconducting qubits to study the nature of the entanglement formed in many-body quantum systems. We generate different quantum states in a 4x4 qubit array and observe a crossover from area-law entanglement scaling for states near the edges of the energy spectrum of the system to volume-law scaling at its center. About the Speaker: Amir received his PhD from MIT in 2023 where his research focused on experimental quantum computation using superconducting qubits, and in particular quantum simulation. Prior to pursuing a PhD Amir graduated from MIT with a B.S. in Physics and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and an M.Eng in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in. Outside of the lab he is involved with various teaching initiatives such as the Qubit by Qubit program as the lead instructor of the year-long introductory quantum computing program aimed towards high school students.
  • 4:50 PM | Quantum Life Panel
    Unlock the intricacies of life in the field of quantum technology with our seasoned speakers at our very own Quantum Life panel discussion! Location: BA1160 Moderator: Anna Dyring About the Moderator: Anna Dyring is the Quantum Strategic Initiative Lead at the Centre for Quantum Information and Quantum Control (CQQIQC), UofT’s quantum centre with more than 30 research groups working both theoretically and experimentally on a range of quantum topics. Anna’s previous roles include project/product manager in several aerospace, technical consulting and biotechnology companies, where she led complex product development and delivery projects. She holds an MSc in Engineering Physics from Uppsala University, Sweden and a PhD in High Energy (Particle) Physics from Uppsala University and CERN. Anna has a broad interest in science, technology and the arts, and enjoys working at the intersection of academia, industry and the public sphere. Speaker: Brianna Lee About the Speaker: Brianna is a Venture Manager and Recruitment Lead at the Creative Destruction Lab’s Quantum Stream. Prior to joining the Quantum team, she led CDL-Seattle recruitment of its first cohort of computational health companies. She has a Bachelor of Commerce from the University of Toronto under the Management Specialist with a double focus in Finance and Strategy & Innovation. Speaker: Michał Stęchły About the Speaker: Michał is a Quantum Software Engineer at PsiQuantum, and before that at Zapata Computing. He has been developing software for both NISQ and fault-tolerant quantum computers for the last 5 years. Michał is an active member of the QC community, helping to grow the quantum open-source ecosystem, organizing events and mentoring people. He also has a blog: www.mustythoughts.com where he writes about QC-related topics. Speaker: Daniel Felipe Nino About the Speaker: Daniel is currently a Quantum Computing Educator at Xanadu, where he helps educators around the world train the next generation of talent in quantum computing and incorporate PennyLane into university curricula. He holds a MSc. in Physics from the University of Toronto, with a research focus on ultracold atomic physics. He also holds a PhD from the University of Toronto specializing in single-molecule biophysics. After a brief postdoc, Daniel taught in various departments within the University of Toronto and was the lead instructor for the INSPIRE Scholars Program hosted at the University of Toronto Mississauga. Speaker: Michael Grabowecky About the Speaker: Michael is the lab coordinator for the Master’s in Quantum Technologies program offered at the University of Waterloo. He obtained his master’s degree from the University of Waterloo’s Institute for Quantum Computing in experimental quantum optics with applications to quantum foundations. Currently, Michael ensures the effective teaching of the experimental component of the Quantum Technologies program. His role includes managing a dedicated laboratory used to deliver the three core hands-on courses offered in the program. Additionally, Michael assists with, and prepares demonstrations for many IQC and TQT outreach events such as the Undergraduate School for Experimental Quantum Information Processing (USEQIP), and the Quantum School for Young Scientists (QSYS), which are yearly summer schools aimed at getting undergraduate and high school students hands-on experience with quantum technologies and sparking interest in quantum STEM fields. Speaker: Aharon Brodutch About the Speaker: Aharon Brodutch leads the Architecture team at IonQ. He joined IonQ following their acquisition of Entangled Networks, a Toronto based startup developing solutions for multi-core quantum computing. Prior to founding Entangled Networks with Ilia Khait in 2020, Aharon held a CQIQC post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Toronto and an IQC post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Waterloo's Institute for Quantum Computing in Waterloo. Aharon Obtained his Phd in theoretical physics and quantum information from Macquarie University, Sydney and his M.Sc and B.Sc from Tel Aviv University.
  • 2:45 PM | Ara Ghukasyan - Agnostiq
    Title: Time Series Anomaly Detection with Quantum Variational Rewinding Location: BA1130 Abstract: A variety of important problems in healthcare, finance, and technology rely on detecting strange, potentially dangerous, sequences of events among normal everyday occurrences. Formally, this is precisely the notion of time series anomaly detection (TAD). Rather than flagging individual events that deviate from the norm – a less difficult problem – a more salient goal here is to identify several events that represent anomalous behaviour when considered in context. In this talk, we present a highly scalable quantum machine learning algorithm for TAD with freely available NISQ hardware. This algorithm, which we refer to as Quantum Variational Rewinding (QVR), relies on training a family of parameterized unitary time-devolution operators to cluster normal time series instances that are encoded within quantum states. In other words, we train a quantum model to “rewind” series-encoding states to initial states which are similar for normal time series, but differ for abnormal ones. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the efficacy of this algorithm on the real-world problem of identifying anomalous transactions in cryptocurrency market data. About the Speaker: Ara Ghukasyan is a Research Software Engineer at Agnostiq Inc. (agnostiq.ai). He holds an undergraduate degree in Mathematics & Physics and a Ph.D. in Engineering Physics from McMaster University. Before working in quantum computing, he researched semiconductor hardware and atomistic simulations of nanoscale heat transport. Ara’s casual interests include music, film, and broad topics in science and computation. Ara also enjoys an avid interest in electric guitar and bass.
  • 3:25 PM | Clarice Aiello - University of California, Los Angeles
    Title: “Quantum Biology”: how nature harnesses quantum processes to function optimally, and how might we control such quantum processes to therapeutic advantage. Location: BA1130 Abstract: Imagine driving cell activities to treat injuries and disease simply by using tailored magnetic fields. Many relevant physiological processes, such as: the regulation of reactive oxygen species; epigenetic changes to induce pluripotency; cell proliferation and wound healing; cellular respiration rates; ion channel functioning; and DNA repair were all demonstrated to be controlled by weak magnetic fields (with a strength on the order of that produced by your cell phone), very likely via the electron quantum property of “spin”. Research has not been able to track spin states to manipulate physiological outcomes in vivo and in real time, without which the potential game-changing clinical benefits of “Quantum Biology” cannot be realized. With novel quantum instrumentation, we are learning to control spin states in cells and tissues, having as a goal to write the “codebook” on how to deterministically alter physiology with weak magnetic fields to therapeutic advantage. In the long-term, the electromagnetic fine-tuning of endogenous “quantum knobs” existing in nature will enable the development of drugs and therapeutic devices that could heal the human body — in a way that is non-invasive, remotely actuated, and easily accessible by anyone with a mobile phone. About the Speaker: Prof. Clarice D. Aiello is a quantum engineer interested in how quantum physics informs biology at the nanoscale. She is an expert on nanosensors harnessing room-temperature quantum effects in noisy environments. Aiello received her B.S. in Physics from the Ecole Polytechnique; her M.Phil. in Physics from the University of Cambridge, Trinity College; and her Ph.D. from MIT in Electrical Engineering. She also held postdoctoral appointments in Bioengineering at Stanford, and in Chemistry at Berkeley. Two months before the pandemic, she joined UCLA, where she leads the Quantum Biology Tech (QuBiT) Lab.
  • 4:30 PM | Michal Stechly - PsiQuantum
    Title: Navigating the jungle of quantum open-source. Location: BA1130 Abstract: In this talk, I'd like to explain how to navigate the jungle of open-source quantum computing projects. I'll go over different types of projects that exist out there and why I think contributing to OS projects is a great way to grow your skills and contribute to the community. About the Speaker: Michał is a Quantum Software Engineer at PsiQuantum, and before that at Zapata Computing. He has been developing software for both NISQ and fault-tolerant quantum computers for the last 5 years. Michał is an active member of the QC community, helping to grow the quantum open-source ecosystem, organizing events and mentoring people. He also has a blog: www.mustythoughts.com where he writes about QC-related topics.
  • 11:55 PM | Student Talks [Part 2]
    Location: BA024 Student: Roeland Wiersema Title: Classification of Dynamical Lie Algebras for Translation-Invariant 2-Local Spin Systems in One Dimension. Abstract: Much is understood about one dimensional spin chains in terms of entanglement properties, physical phases, and integrability. However, the Lie algebraic properties of the Hamiltonians describing these systems remain largely unexplored. In this talk, I will present a classification of all Lie algebras generated by translation-invariant 2-local spin chain Hamiltonians, or so-called dynamical Lie algebras. I will discuss chains with open and periodic boundary conditions and show that there exist 17 unique dynamical Lie algebras. The classification covers some well-known models such as the transverse-field Ising model and the Heisenberg chain, but we also find more exotic classes of Hamiltonians that cannot be identified easily. I will discuss the practical implications of this work in the context of quantum control, variational quantum computing, and the spin chain literature. Location: BA025 Student: Luis Mantilla Calderon Title: Measurement-based Quantum Machine Learning. Abstract: A quantum neural network (QNN) is an object that extends the notion of a classical neural network to quantum models for quantum data. We can create a QNN by parametrizing a quantum process and then using it to model unknown relations between quantum states. In this talk, we explore how to use measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) for quantum machine learning (QML) problems and propose a universal QNN in this framework which we call the multiple-triangle ansatz (MuTA). Using the proposed QNN, we solve several tasks, including learning a universal set of gates, a POVM with post-processing, a quantum instrument, and the classification of classical data. Finally, we discuss how to train an ansatz under the hardware constraints imposed by photonic Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill (GKP) qubits.
  • 5:30 PM | Award Ceremony
    Get ready to applaud innovation and excellence at the Q-SITE Awards Ceremony! Join us as we celebrate and honour our participants. It's a night of celebration you won't want to miss. Location: BA1160
  • 1:15 PM | Anne Broadbent - University of Ottawa
    Title: Quantum Unclonability and Cryptography Location: BA1130 Abstract: According to the unclonability property of quantum information, it is not possible, in general, to duplicate an unknown quantum state. Quantum cryptography is the science of communication and computation in the presence of an adversary. Because quantum adversaries are also bound by the unclonability property, this creates a myriad of opportunities for quantum cryptographers. We will discuss how unclonability permeates quantum cryptography: from the early findings on quantum money and quantum key distribution, to recent work on unclonable quantum encryption, certified deletion, and unclonable software. About the Speaker: Prof. Broadbent is a Full Professor at the University of Ottawa, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, with cross appointments to the Department of Physics and to the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Prof. Broadbent holds the University or Ottawa Research Chair in Quantum Information and Cryptography. Her research relates to cryptography, communication, and information processing in a quantum world. Prof. Broadbent’s research is recognized by multiple awards and accolades, including the University of Ottawa Young Researcher of the Year Award (2019), the Ontario Early Researcher Award (2016), the André Aisenstadt Prize in Mathematics (2016), the John Charles Polanyi Prize (2010) and the NSERC Doctoral Prize (2009).
  • 12:10 PM | Student Talks [Part 3]
    Location: BA025 Student: Danial Motlagh Title: Generalized Quantum Signal Processing. Abstract: Quantum Signal Processing (QSP) and Quantum Singular Value Transformation (QSVT) currently stand as the most efficient techniques for implementing functions of block encoded matrices, a central task that lies at the heart of most prominent quantum algorithms. However, current QSP approaches face several challenges, such as the restrictions imposed on the family of achievable polynomials and the difficulty of calculating the required phase angles for specific transformations. In this paper, we present a Generalized Quantum Signal Processing (GQSP) approach, employing general SU(2) rotations as our signal processing operators, rather than relying solely on rotations in a single basis. Our approach lifts all practical restrictions on the family of achievable transformations, with the sole remaining condition being that $|P|\leq 1$, a restriction necessary due to the unitary nature of quantum computation. Furthermore, GQSP provides a straightforward recursive formula for determining the rotation angles needed to construct the polynomials in cases where $P$ and $Q$ are known. In cases where only $P$ is known, we provide an efficient optimization algorithm capable of identifying in under a minute of GPU time, a corresponding $Q$ for polynomials of degree on the order of $10^7$. We further illustrate GQSP simplifies QSP-based strategies for Hamiltonian simulation, offer an optimal solution to the $\epsilon$-approximate fractional query problem that requires $\mathcal{O}\left(\frac{1}{\delta} + \log(\large\frac{1}{\epsilon})\right)$ queries to perform where $\mathcal{O}(1/\delta)$ is a proved lower bound, and introduces novel approaches for implementing bosonic operators. Moreover, we propose a novel framework for the implementation of normal matrices, demonstrating its applicability through synthesis of diagonal matrices, as well as the development of a new algorithm for convolution through synthesis of circulant matrices using only $\mathcal{O}(d \log{N} + \log^2N)$ 1 and 2-qubit gates for a filter of lengths $d$.
  • 3:05 PM | Jane Dong - IBM Quantum
    Title: Getting Started with Quantum Computing Location: BA1130 Abstract: Curious about IBM's Quantum ecosystem and development roadmap? Come learn more about the IBM Quantum Network, Qiskit community and exciting offerings that can empower you with the knowledge and resources you need to begin your quantum computing journey. About the Speaker: Jane Dong is an IBM Quantum Ambassador and Digital Enablement Leader for Hybrid Cloud Services. Jane graduated from the University of Toronto specializing in Physics and Mathematics with high distinction. She has solutioned and delivered enterprise level digital solutions for clients across North America. Outside of her Quantum Ambassador role, Jane and her team focus on creating digital, emerging tech and hybrid cloud solutions consulting works the following streams: Solution Envisioning, Proof-of-concept Development, Production Ready Pilot development services for clients in Energy Utilities, Retail, Engineering & Construction, FSS and Public Sectors.
  • 9:00 AM | Registration and Snacks
    Indulge in some snacks as we commence the final day of Q-SITE! Location: Bahen Centre for Information Technology
  • 10:00 AM | Gaurav Saxena - LG Electronics Toronto AI Lab
    Title: Introduction to magic states: the resource to achieve universal fault tolerant quantum computation. Location: BA1130 Abstract: Fault-tolerant quantum computation can be achieved using the stabilizer formalism. However, stabilizer circuits can not perform universal quantum computation. Morevover, it has been shown that quantum circuits made out of stabilizer operations with stabilizer states as inputs can be efficiently simulated on a classical computer. Hence, stabilizer circuits do not provide any quantum computational advantage. To achieve universal quantum computations, magic states need to be injected in stabilizer circuits. In this talk, I will first first talk about stabilizer state and stabilizer operations, and then will discuss about magic states, their quantification, and interconversion. In the end, I will briefly talk about recent classical simulation algorithms of quantum circuits with magic states as inputs and how the runtime of such algorithms scale with different magic states. About the Speaker: Gaurav is a quantum research scientist at LG AI Toronto Lab and is currently working on quantum algorithms and error mitigation. Gaurav obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Calgary where he worked on quantum information, specifically, dynamical quantum resource theories. In his Ph.D., he has developed dynamical resource theories of coherence and magic. His research interests encompass a wide range of topics in quantum information and computing. He loves to talk about quantum and can easily be reached out to via LinkedIn.
  • 9:40 AM | Michael Grabowecky - Institute for Quantum Computing
    Title: IQC: Introducing a hands-on graduate degree in quantum technologies. Location: BA1130 Abstract: The Master of Science in Quantum Technology program is a novel, one-year, coursed-based degree aimed at providing students with a robust experimental skillset through hands-on experience using state-of-the-art equipment relevant to the forefront of modern quantum technology research. This program is offered in partnership with the Department of Physics and Astronomy, the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC), and the Transformative Quantum Technologies research initiative (TQT) at the University of Waterloo. The program features three dedicated courses in experimental quantum information science. Through these courses, students explore spin dynamics and coherent control systems, quantum optical systems, and superconducting electronic devices. Students are offered the opportunity of engaging in a one semester work term with a supervisor of their choosing, enabling access to research experience in state-of-the-art laboratories. This program aims to prepare students to enter the ever-growing quantum industry, and for transitioning into high-impact Ph.D. positions focused on experimental quantum information processing. About the Speaker: Michael is the lab coordinator for the Master’s in Quantum Technologies program offered at the University of Waterloo. He obtained his master’s degree from the University of Waterloo’s Institute for Quantum Computing in experimental quantum optics with applications to quantum foundations. Currently, Michael ensures the effective teaching of the experimental component of the Quantum Technologies program. His role includes managing a dedicated laboratory used to deliver the three core hands-on courses offered in the program. Additionally, Michael assists with, and prepares demonstrations for many IQC and TQT outreach events such as the Undergraduate School for Experimental Quantum Information Processing (USEQIP), and the Quantum School for Young Scientists (QSYS), which are yearly summer schools aimed at getting undergraduate and high school students hands-on experience with quantum technologies and sparking interest in quantum STEM fields.
  • 2:05 PM | Erik Garcell - Classiq [Lightning Talk]
    Title: Classiq and the Future of Quantum Computing Location: BA1130 About the Speaker: Dr. Erik Garcell is technical marketing manager at Classiq, which is revolutionizing the process of developing quantum computing software by taking quantum software to a higher level. Dr. Garcell was previously innovation product manager for IP.com and an innovation research scientist at Kodak Alaris. He has a doctorate in physics from the University of Rochester and a Master of Science in Technical Entrepreneurship & Management from the University of Rochester’s Simon School of Business.
  • 11:40 AM | Student Talks [Part 1]
    Location: BA024 Student: Andrei Olar Title: Atomistic Simulation of 3nm FinFET properties for use in Spin-Based Quantum Computers. Abstract: Quantum computers have the potential to reshape how science is done in the future, allowing physicists, biologists, and chemists, among others, the opportunity to better simulate the real-world phenomena they are interested in. This is in large part due to the fact that quantum computers are inherently intertwined with quantum effects, and as such provide an unparalleled tool for understanding the strange world of quantum. This is all not to say that we are on the cusp of reaching these truths, rather there is a lot of work still left to be done. Spin-Based Quantum computers could prove to be scalable, efficient, and viable for use in a range of applications, but currently face some roadblocks. Modern FinFET and FDSOI technologies that are suitable for high-density quantum processor applications have constraints that limit the types of quantum dot arrays and gates that can be implemented. A quantum dot is an electron trapped in a potential well and QDs can serve as qubits. Since these transistor technologies serve as potential traps for the electrons, they are paramount for viable Quantum Computers. 3nm FinFET technology would not have these same constraints, and as such could be a viable path forward for scaling, as they allow better QD entangled gates, though higher temperature behavior and explanations for measured characteristics are not currently available. This is what my research focuses on, as I plan to simulate scaled versions of these FinFETs in order to gauge their behavior and help inform manufacturer choices in the future. Though only one FinFET simulation is currently available, more designs will be iterated on. Location: BA025 Student: Nishaant Jacobus Title: Controlling Non-Equilibrium Steady States via Environmental Tuning. Abstract: While isolated quantum systems undergo unitary evolution as described by the Schrödinger Equation, these dynamics are significantly altered when these systems interact with their environment. Elucidating the behavior of these open quantum systems has many applications, including the realization of quantum computing and understanding the role of quantum mechanics in biological processes such as light harvesting and vision. In particular, environmental influences allow these systems to attain non-equilibrium steady states (NESS) that show strong dependencies on the properties of the closed system. For instance, we have shown computationally that the quantum yield of the photoisomerization of rhodopsin, the first step of vision, has a sensitive dependence on closed system parameters such as the electronic energy gap. Further studies on a broader family of models such as the Rabi Model showed that this sensitivity is a general property of open systems, with spikes in flux rates correlated with low-energy avoided crossings. Given this strong dependence of the NESS on the properties of the system, a natural follow-up question is whether the NESS exhibits a similar dependence on the environment; namely, for a fixed system, can we control the steady state by tuning the system-environment coupling? To investigate this question, we numerically examine the steady state properties of exciton transport in the Holstein Model, a chain of sites coupled to local harmonic modes that could represent scenarios such as energy transport in polymers. We find that the steady-state exciton populations can be controlled by tuning the dissipation strength of the environment, and we note an interesting parallel between this steady state behavior and the transient dynamics of the system. These results suggest that it may be possible to optimize the performance of a quantum system by engineering the environment appropriately.
  • 2:25 PM | Anna Dyring - CQIQC, University of Toronto
    Title: Quantum Careers Location: BA1130 Abstract: I will talk broadly about quantum career paths and how CQIQC supports students through a range of learning and research opportunities in quantum science and technology. I will also share some observations and advice that may help anyone interested in exploring a career in the exciting and growing quantum sector. My goal is to inform, inspire, and challenge. About the Speaker: Anna Dyring is the Quantum Strategic Initiative Lead at the Centre for Quantum Information and Quantum Control (CQQIQC), UofT’s quantum centre with more than 30 research groups working both theoretically and experimentally on a range of quantum topics. Anna’s previous roles include project/product manager in several aerospace, technical consulting and biotechnology companies, where she led complex product development and delivery projects. She holds an MSc in Engineering Physics from Uppsala University, Sweden and a PhD in High Energy (Particle) Physics from Uppsala University and CERN. Anna has a broad interest in science, technology and the arts, and enjoys working at the intersection of academia, industry and the public sphere.
  • How will the mini-challenges work?
    All attendees will be given access to the conference Discord server. On Friday and Saturday, in-person attendees will be given the opportunity to network with each other and find their mini-challenges team of size 2-4. Online attendees will do so via networking channels on the Discord server. Before the challenges are released, all teams must register via a Google Form (one submission per team). GitHub instructions on how to access challenges and submit responses will be provided. Upon submitting on Saturday night, winners and awards will be declared during the Sunday closing ceremony.
  • Do I need to be an expert or have existing knowledge in quantum to attend this conference?
    Absolutely not. The Q-SITE program is specifically designed to jump start attendees’ quantum curiosity and careers – from the ground up. The first talk will be an introductory talk on the basics of quantum computing and relevant technologies. We hope for this talk to catch everyone up to speed with the foundational concepts needed to engage in the rest of the conference.
  • What is the Entanglement project?
    After answering a series of questions during registration, our “Entanglement” ML model will place each attendees on a “map of technical interests”. We aim for this networking tool to allow attendees to connect with like-minded fellows as well as reach out to specific people with specific interests.
  • Who is Q-SITE 2023 for?
    Q-SITE 2023 is a conference created by students, for students. Specifically, we aim to address undergraduates and early graduates who are either (1) new to the field of quantum technologies or (2) interested in pursuing an aspect of the field different from their profession. As a result of this conference, attendees will get the opportunity to become aware of the breadth of interdisciplinary fields quantum technologies have to offer. We hope this allows them enough time to confidently choose a path or subfield that they want to pursue further.
  • What are the student poster and student talk sessions?
    The student poster and talk sessions give a chance for undergraduate and graduate students to present their quantum research work in a conference setting. Not only do we aim to exercise student presentation skills but more importantly, showcase student contributions and endeavours in quantum information science and technologies.
  • What are the differences between the in-person and online experiences?
    Both experiences will be able to engage (and win prizes) in the mini-challenges (mini-hackathon) provided by key sponsor companies and view golden hour talks streamed between the two conference locations. However, only in-person attendees will be able to engage in the UofT quantum research lab tours and networking dinner provided on Friday evening, student poster session and graduate fair on Saturday afternoon, and student talks on Sunday morning. The conference lasts for a half-day on Friday and full-day on Saturday and Sunday; online attendees will be streamed only the full-day Saturday and Sunday talks.
  • Mojtaba (Moji) Khavaninzadeh @ UofT
    Moji is passionate about quantum information and much interested in quantum hardware architectures to build quantum computers. He is in his 5th year at UofT, specializing in Physics and minoring in Economics.
  • Vivek Dhande @UofT
    My name is Vivek, an Engineering Science student specializing in Engineering Physics. I am currently on my PEY at Xanadu and also doing research in semiconductor quantum dots for spin-qubit quantum computing. Other than learning about all the different quantum hardware architectures, I love trail running and hiking, especially in the Canadian Rockies.
  • Director: Mayank Shenoy @ UofT
    Hello there. I'm Mayank Shenoy and I am in the fourth and final year of my astrophysics undergraduate degree. My research interest primarily lies in late stages of massive stellar evolution and death along with the quantum mechanical implications on high energy physics. I hope to dabble in the latter during this year and my future endeavours. If you see a big guy who looks like he has made his long hair his whole personality, come say hii and chat about sneakers, lifting, cooking or even research (since it is a conference XD).
  • Web Developer: Elizabeth Tyra Sumual @ UofT
    Hey, I’m Tyra! I’m an incoming third-year Electrical and Computer Engineering student. As I prefer hardware more than software, I want to learn more about quantum hardware and the intricacies inherent in constructing such technology. Outside of engineering, I like to cook different cuisines of food, read self-help books, play badminton, and go to concerts.
  • Web Developer: Krishna Advait Sripada @ UofT
    Greetings! I'm Krishna, a 3rd-year Computer Engineering student with dual minors in AI and Business. I'm deeply passionate about all things software and AI. Exploring Quantum machine learning and supercomputers intrigues me, as I believe they hold the power to reshape our world. Beyond the tech realm, I'm a speedcuber (did you know I solve a 3x3 Rubik’s cube in 10 seconds?), and I enjoy engaging in sports like cricket, soccer, badminton, table tennis, swimming, dodgeball, pool, and foosball.
  • Director: Emily Su @ UofT
    Hey! Emily here. I’m in my third year of undergrad studying statistics, computer science, and computational cognitive science. I’m interested in quantum algorithms and their application, as well as designing & developing aesthetically pleasing products (graphics, websites, etc.). In my free time, I enjoy taking dance and gymnastics classes, listening to music (specifically old pop, Kpop, and Jpop), and playing story-driven/tactical RPG games.
  • Web Developer: Vivian Song @ UofT
    I’m a second-year student pursuing a specialist in computer science at the University of Toronto. As an aspiring software engineer, I'm interested in the vast potential in computing efficiency offered by quantum computers as opposed to existing supercomputers. In my free time, I enjoy playing the guitar, skating, watching K-dramas, and going restaurant-hunting in downtown Toronto!
  • Associate: Michael Silver @ UofT
    Hi, everyone. My name is Michael. I’m entering my second year of Electrical Engineering. I am interested in superconducting QC and quantum machine learning. I like to play basketball, skateboard in downtown Toronto, and listen to RnB in my free time.
  • Associate: Amber King @ UofT
  • Director: Amelie Zhang @ UofT
    Hi everyone! I am a fourth year undergrad in math specialist and physics specialist program, along with a minor in computer science at the University of Toronto. My current research interest lies between experimental and theoretical physics in the field of quantum optics. Recently, I have been building a brand new atomic clock with my research group which will potentially define our new definition of a second in time. I am curious about the world in all aspects. Beyond academia, I love playing the piano (especially at Hart House), gyming, golfing, playing chess, reading sci-fi novels, going to rec room, and exploring different restaurants with my friends.
  • Associate: Adam Radek Martinez @ UofT
    I am a fourth-year engineering science student specializing in Physics. As an engineer, I am fundamentally interested in getting a robust, scalable quantum processing platform to work - right now, my intuition says that solid-state spin systems may be the best candidate. Outside of Physics, I enjoy running and exploring Japanese Ramen shops in Toronto with friends.
  • Director: Arkaprava Choudhury @ UofT
    I am a fourth-year computer science and maths specialist focusing on the theory of computation. I’m interested in quantum algorithms for Hamiltonian simulation, complexity theory (especially time- and query-complexity and probabilistic classes), and online algorithms. I love cycling, shogi, and underground manga and am interested in computational cognition and linguistics. I also like chatting about good Indian restaurants in Toronto.
  • Associate: Aditya Chugh @UofT
    I’m a third-year undergraduate student in the Mathematics and Physics Specialist Program at UofT. I’m interested in all things quantum, and I also love engaging in outreach/exposition from time to time (which is what brought me to this amazing conference!). I’ve previously worked in balloon astrophysics and dark matter phenomenology. When not doing physics (or thinking of doing physics), I like to go on runs, play soccer, or make jokes which are sometimes funny.
  • Associate: Chaitanya Kumar Mahajan @ UofT
    Heyo! I’m in my third year studying physics and computer science. I’m interested in experimental particle physics and the hardware of quantum computers. Over the summer, I worked with a tiny portion of the ATLAS ITk upgrade. In my free time, I’m either walking to Harbor Front or already there and reading some fantasy novel.
  • Associate: Sophia Bonellos @ UofT
  • Director: Umi Yamaguchi @UofT
    Hey guys, my name is Umi. I’ll be a second-year at UofT majoring in Physics and Statistics, interested in quantum software and finance applications. I enjoy training, baking, watching anime, and learning new things in my spare time! I hope you will enjoy our conference :D
  • Associate: Youssef Rachad @ UofT
    Hi, I’m a 3rd year engineering physics major who enjoys quantum computing, deep learning and numerical methods. I also write on the QNews team and explore the latest discoveries in quantum computing (currently, I’m learning about superconducting and neutral atom devices). Outside of numbers, I enjoy running, biking and playing chess. See you all at Q-SITE!
  • Director: Margaret Guo @ UofT
    Hello! My name is Margaret and I’m going into my 3rd year of Engineering Physics. This summer, I delved into quantum interferometry, dabbled in various quantum computing applications and explored the intersection of astrophysics and machine learning! Attending QSITE 2022 allowed me to discover my interest in quantum computing and technology so I am incredibly excited to be a part of QSITE this year! Outside of quantum, I love hiking, biking, fountain pens and collecting souvenir shot glasses from my travels. Here’s to a great conference!
  • Associate: Samantha Corapi @ UofT
    Hi, I’m Sam! I am entering my first year of an MSc in Chemistry. I am interested in researching machine learning applications to chemistry. During my free time, I enjoy going on long walks, listening to music, trying new restaurants in Toronto, and attending quantum computing conferences!!! :)
  • Director: Shaswata Chowdhury @UofT
    Hello - I’m Shaswata, and I’m a third-year Physics and Computer Science student with a focus on machine learning. I’m interested in superconducting quantum computing and condensed matter physics, so feel free to reach out if you’re interested in those! I like reading fiction, playing RPGs and playing badminton. Let’s chat at Q-SITE!
  • Associate: Radhika Banerjea @ UofT
    Hello! I am a second-year Engineering Science student. I’m interested in learning more about Quantum Machine Learning and its applications. When I’m not rewatching shows on Netflix, I like to swim, read, listen to music, and paint.
  • Associate: Yvonne Zhang @ UofT
    Hi, everyone! I’m in my PEY co-op year for Mechanical Engineering, minoring in Robotics & Mechatronics. When I’m not spending all my money on concerts and Broadway, I love taking my cat on walks and bike rides.
  • Director: Maggie Li @ UofT
    Hey, I’m Maggie! I’m a third-year Engineering Science student specializing in Biomedical Systems Engineering. I’m interested in regenerative medicine, biophysics (especially crossovers of quantum mechanics in biology), and longevity/aging biology. Some other things I like include matcha, memoirs, art, design, dogs, hiking, cooking, trying different cuisines of food, and sci-fi. Say hi! :)
  • Associate: Stephanie Cui @ UofT
    Hi, everyone! I’m a second-year student studying Physics and Philosophy, and quantum mechanics is an exemplar of the nexus between these two fields. I’m thrilled to delve more into this fascinating topic in my upcoming courses as well as at the Q-SITE conference! I’m also very passionate about literature, so I read and write a lot during my free time.
  • Associate: Parth Mahendru @ UofT
    Third-year engineering science student with a background in Aerospace Coating Technologies, Control Systems, Quantum Physics, Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence, and Computer Vision. Deeply interested in the intersection of engineering processes, quantum phenomena, and AI-driven experimentations. Passionate about leveraging these insights to develop novel methods that accelerate scientific progress.
  • Associate: Kamal Mohamed Ali @ Memorial University of Newfoundland
    As a recent graduate with a Bachelor’s in Computer Engineering, I am passionate about developing software that makes a positive impact. I am also big on hackathons which led me to start my university’s first hackathon, and I have since worked with many student communities. Hoping to break into quantum computing one day!
  • Director: Haneen Sakaji @ Toronto Metropolitan University
    Welcome! My name is Haneen, and I am a second-year Medical Physics major. I am highly intrigued by the applications of quantum sensors to the field of medical physics, such as quantum brain sensors and improved radiation therapy. My hobbies include robotics, art and biking.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

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Quantum Bits

Explore the Quantum Bits Facts: A weekly agenda delving into diverse concepts from the realm of quantum mechanics, all presented in an engaging and accessible manner.

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